Parents need to be convinced their daughters should receive HPV vaccine

May 04, 2010

Even when financial and healthcare barriers are removed, some parents remain hesitant to have their daughters receive the HPV vaccine. As a result, policymakers must develop and implement strategies to ensure optimal HPV vaccine uptake, says new research in this week's PLoS Medicine. Gina Ogilvie and colleagues surveyed parents of grade 6 girls (age 11) in a publicly funded school-based program in British Columbia, Canada, to determine the level of uptake of the first dose of the HPV vaccine, and to examine the factors involved in their decision to allow receipt of the vaccine.

Sixty five percent of the 2,025 who completed the survey had consented to their daughter receiving the first dose of . By contrast, more than 85% of the parents reported to have consented to B and meningitis C vaccinations for their daughters.

Of those who did not consent, almost a third of the parents said concern about the vaccine's safety was their main reason and one in eight said they had not been given sufficient information to make an informed decision.

The authors report that a positive parental attitude towards vaccination and a parental belief that HPV vaccination had limited impact on sexual practices increased the likelihood of a daughter receiving the HPV vaccine. Having a family with two parents or three or more children and having well-educated parents decreased the likelihood of a daughter receiving the vaccine.

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More information: Ogilvie G, Anderson M, Marra F, McNeil S, Pielak K, et al. (2010) A Population-Based Evaluation of a Publicly Funded, School-Based HPV Vaccine Program in British Columbia, Canada: Parental Factors Associated with HPV Vaccine Receipt. PLoS Med 7(5): e1000270. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000270

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JerryPark
1 / 5 (1) May 04, 2010
There are probably at least two reasons for the reluctance of parents to consent to their daughters getting HPV vaccine:

1) How safe is the vaccine and how effective? Difficult to know with a new vaccine.

2) If the vaccine is safe and effective, why is it only recommended for girls? Boys get HPV and the get the cancers HPV causes.

Item number two says perhaps the vaccine is not as safe and effective as advertised.
deatopmg
1 / 5 (1) May 05, 2010
"...policymakers must develop and implement strategies to ensure optimal HPV vaccine uptake,..."

Is this true, or does it really mean; optimize financial return of the vaccine maker or ensure that the Canadian gov't gets its money worth from vaccine already purchased??

The vaccine has some reported serious side effects but what is the societal cost/benefit?.

Knowing who funded this study and the relationship, if any, the authors have with the Industrial Medical Complex would help clarify these questions?
JayK
1 / 5 (2) May 05, 2010
Yeah, that's what this story needed, the conspiracy theory angle. Why didn't the author think of that!?

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