HPV vaccination more likely if mothers approve

Apr 12, 2010

College women were more likely to be vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) if their mothers communicated with them about sex and if they thought their mothers would approve of their getting vaccinated, according to new Dartmouth research in the May issue of Pediatrics (published online April 12).

Meg Gerrard, PhD, of Dartmouth Medical School and Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Megan Roberts, a PhD student at Dartmouth College, and their colleagues, surveyed 972 female undergraduates at a large Midwestern university between November 2007 and April 2009. An anonymous questionnaire assessed the undergraduate's sexual-risk behavior, knowledge of HPV, perceptions of HPV risk, communication from their mothers about sex-related topics (including HPV), and their current .

Sixty-five percent of the women reported being sexually active, and 49% reported having received at least the first of the three-shot HPV series. Those who were unvaccinated were more likely to be interested in future vaccination if they thought their mothers would approve. The young women's perceptions of their risk of contracting HPV also contributed to their interest in getting vaccinated. Young women whose had discussed values in relation to sex were, as a group, less interested in being vaccinated.

The authors concluded that "mother-daughter communication and approval of vaccination emerged as important predictors of young women's HPV-vaccination behavior and intentions, even after the women were old enough to not require parental approval." They also noted that college-age women "are still a very important population to target for vaccination."

Explore further: Clinical trial of Auxilium's Xiaflex shows it to be effective in smoothing cellulite

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

One in four California adolescent girls has had HPV vaccine

Feb 17, 2009

Less than two years after the HPV vaccine was approved as a routine vaccination for girls aged 11 and older, one-quarter of California adolescent girls have started the series of shots that protect against human papillomavirus, ...

Recommended for you

Using computers to design drugs

4 hours ago

Designing a new medicine is an expensive and time consuming business. Typically it takes around $2 billion and ten years for a new drug to move from its initial design in the lab, to the clinic. All the ...

Lilly psoriasis drug fares well in late-stage test

9 hours ago

Drugmaker Eli Lilly and Co. said its potential psoriasis treatment fared better than both a fake drug and a competitor's product during late-stage testing on patients with the most common form of the skin disease.

New US restrictions on painkiller to take effect

22 hours ago

The federal government is finalizing new restrictions on hundreds of medicines containing hydrocodone, the highly addictive painkiller that has grown into the most widely prescribed drug in the U.S.

User comments : 0