Guided Care participants rate quality of health care high

Jan 19, 2010

Chronically ill older adults who are closely supported by a nurse-physician primary care team are twice as likely to rate their health care as high-quality than those who receive usual care, according to a study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

The research, published online in the latest edition of the , found that after 18 months of a , Guided Care recipients rated their primary care significantly higher than usual care recipients with regard to coordination with specialists, support for self-management, and help received with setting goals, making decisions and solving health-related problems. Guided Care patients were also 70 percent more likely to rate the time they had to wait for an appointment when sick as "excellent" or "good", and 50 percent more likely to rate the ability to get phone advice as "excellent" or "good."

"These findings show that Guided Care can improve many of the important dimensions of care quality," said Cynthia M. Boyd, MD, MPH, lead author of the study and assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. "Improving chronic care is not just about reducing cost, but it also includes improving the quality of the care that patients receive."

Previously published data suggested that, compared to usual care patients, Guided Care patients tended to spend less time in hospitals and skilled nursing facilities and had fewer emergency room visits and home health episodes, producing an annual net savings for health care insurers (after accounting for the costs of Guided Care) of $1,365 (11 percent) per patient, or $75,000 per nurse. Other studies have shown that Guided Care reduces family caregiver strain and improves physicians' satisfaction with chronic care.

Guided Care is a model of proactive, comprehensive health care provided by physician-nurse teams for patients with several chronic health conditions. It is a type of "medical home" for this rapidly growing population. This model is designed to improve complex patients' quality of life and quality of care, while improving the efficiency of their treatment. The care teams include a registered nurse, two to five primary care physicians, and other members of the office staff who work together for the benefit of each patient. Following a comprehensive assessment and planning process, the Guided Care nurse educates and empowers patients and families, monitors their conditions monthly, and coordinates the efforts of professionals, hospitals and community agencies to be sure that no important health-related need slips through the cracks.

Explore further: Oil-swishing craze: Snake oil or all-purpose remedy?

More information: "The Effects of Guided Care on the Perceived Quality of Health Care for Multi-morbid Older Persons: 18-Month Outcomes from a Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial", Journal of General Internal Medicine.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Minority health-care clinics separate but unequal

Feb 09, 2009

A study published today in the Archives of Internal Medicine may shed new light on why minority Americans have poorer health outcomes from chronic conditions such as hypertension, heart disease and diabetes.

Evolving roles difficult for GPs but good for patients

Jun 13, 2008

The solutions to Australia's general practitioner shortage are not just in increasing GP numbers, but in developing new roles to care for patients, according to research published by the Australian Primary Health Care Research ...

Recommended for you

Suddenly health insurance is not for sale

20 hours ago

(HealthDay)— Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.

Study: Half of jailed NYC youths have brain injury (Update)

20 hours ago

About half of all 16- to 18-year-olds coming into New York City's jails say they had a traumatic brain injury before being incarcerated, most caused by assaults, according to a new study that's the latest in a growing body ...

Autonomy and relationships among 'good life' goals

Apr 18, 2014

Young adults with Down syndrome have a strong desire to be self-sufficient by living independently and having a job, according to a study into the meaning of wellbeing among young people affected by the disorder.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Treating depression in Parkinson's patients

A group of scientists from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging has found interesting new information in a study on depression and neuropsychological function in Parkinson's ...

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.

Health care site flagged in Heartbleed review

People with accounts on the enrollment website for President Barack Obama's signature health care law are being told to change their passwords following an administration-wide review of the government's vulnerability to the ...