Breast cancer incidence in Spain drops in early 2000s after decades of increasing rates

Oct 26, 2009

After a steady increase of invasive breast cancer cases in Spanish women during the 1980s and 1990s, incidence rates abruptly declined starting in 2001—a trend most likely explained by a period effect linked to screening saturation, according to a new study published online October 26 in the Journal of the national cancer institute.

Marina Pollán, M.D., Ph.D., of the Centro Nacional de Epidemiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III in Madrid, and colleagues identified invasive cases from population-based cancer registries in Spain that had at least 10 years of uninterrupted registration over the period 1980჻�. The researchers took into account the starting year of the corresponding breast cancer screening program for the population and the year in which the screening program achieved full coverage of the target population.

Overall incidence rates rose by 2.9% annually during the 1980s and 1990s, but there was a statistically significant change in this trend in 2001, when incidence declined annually by 3.0%. There was a steady increase in incidence for women younger than 45 years, an abrupt downturn in 2001 for women aged 45󈞬 years, and a gradual leveling off in 1995 for women aged 65 years or older.

The sharp decline could be a result of the introduction of screening programs, according to the authors. When screening programs are introduced, cancer incidence can rise because diagnoses occur earlier than they would have without screening. But this rise is temporary.

"Once the program is in place and screening coverage of the target population reaches a plateau, incidence rates tend to decrease because the pool of undiagnosed prevalent cases has been reduced," the authors write. "We found that the change point in breast cancer incidence in Spain occurred in 2001, but this overall trend is likely to be the consequence of changes acting on different age groups and regions at different times."

Source: (news : web)

Explore further: Scientists map out how childhood brain tumors relapse

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Mammography rates declining in the United States

May 14, 2007

Since 2000 mammography rates have declined significantly in the United States, according to a new study. Published in the June 15, 2007 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study by ...

Breast cancer tumors grow faster in younger women

May 08, 2008

A new approach to estimating tumour growth based on breast screening results from almost 400,000 women is published today BioMed Central’s open access journal, Breast Cancer Research. This new model can also estimate the pr ...

Recommended for you

Putting the brakes on cancer

4 hours ago

A study led by the University of Dundee, in collaboration with researchers at our University, has uncovered an important role played by a tumour suppressor gene, helping scientists to better understand how ...

Peanut component linked to cancer spread

5 hours ago

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found that a component of peanuts could encourage the spread and survival of cancer cells in the body.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.