A serving of soy a day can help keep breast cancer away

Oct 23, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- It is estimated that 40,170 women will die from breast cancer in 2009, and while much less common in men, they are not immune to the disease. It is estimated that 1,910 diagnoses of invasive breast cancer in men will be made this year.

October, which is National Awareness Month, is a time to think about early breast cancer detection and prevention. Routine and clinical breast exams are two of the early detection methods that are credited with the decline in breast cancer deaths.

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, including watching weight and what types of food are consumed is another way to help decrease the risk of developing breast cancer.

The American Institute for Cancer Research recommends that at least two-thirds of your plate be filled with vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans. These plant-based foods provide vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that evidence shows may have anti-cancer effects.

“Soy is one of the foods that science shows may reduce a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer,” said Gretchen Hofing, Michigan State University extension soyfoods health educator and a registered dietitian based in Lenawee County.

Research indicates that consuming soyfoods during childhood and adolescence could make the biggest difference, with results showing one to two servings of soyfoods a day during could cut in half a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer later in life.

“Soyfoods are family-friendly foods with a wide variety of products available in mainstream grocery stores,” Hofing said.

Provided by Michigan State University (news : web)

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