Focal therapy and prostate cancer

Oct 22, 2009
A recent study by Liu and colleagues has shown that metastases in prostate cancer have a common origin — that is, they originate from the same clone. If the single lesion harboring this metastatic clone could be accurately identified and then targeted, it seems likely that the side effects of treatment for prostate cancer would be reduced. The other lesions (depicted as purple cells in the prostate) would undergo surveillance.

(PhysOrg.com) -- UCL researcher Hashim Uddin Ahmed is conducting a series of world-first trials into an alternative form of treatment for prostate cancer.

Prostate is the most common cancer affecting men in the UK, with conventional treatment for the disease causing many distressing sid effects.

Mr Ahmed is a Medical Research Council Clinical Research Fellow in the UCL Division of Surgery and Interventional Science. Results from the groundbreaking trials he has undertaken have shown that one-third of men with might benefit from high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU).

The today published a commentary by Mr Ahmed about his work in this area. Mr Ahmed explains his research below.


“Prostate Cancer affects 500,000 men around the world every year. The incidence is increasing because we are detecting lower risk cancers in younger men at an earlier stage.

“Many of these men have treatment which gives them very little benefit in terms of life expectancy, but subjects them to considerable harm. One in two are impotent, one in ten need to wear pads because of urine leakage and one in ten have back passage problems.

“Prostate Cancer affects 500,000 men around the world every year. The incidence is increasing because we are detecting lower risk cancers in younger men at an earlier stage.

“Many of these men have treatment which gives them very little benefit in terms of , but subjects them to considerable harm. One in two are impotent, one in ten need to wear pads because of urine leakage and one in ten have back passage problems.

More information: content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/361/17/1704

Provided by University College London (news : web)

Explore further: Team finds new genetic anomalies in lung cancer

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New risk factor for prostate cancer

Oct 08, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- The greater the levels of a protein called Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), the greater the risk of prostate cancer, an Oxford University-led study has found. The results are published in the journal ...

Recommended for you

Bone loss drugs may help prevent endometrial cancer

4 hours ago

A new analysis suggests that women who use bisphosphonates—medications commonly used to treat osteoporosis and other bone conditions—have about half the risk of developing endometrial cancer as women who do not use the ...

Putting the brakes on cancer

Dec 19, 2014

A study led by the University of Dundee, in collaboration with researchers at our University, has uncovered an important role played by a tumour suppressor gene, helping scientists to better understand how ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

E_L_Earnhardt
1 / 5 (1) Oct 23, 2009
Suspect a daily "sits bath" in cool water might arrest the problem indefinately without surgery or other disablement.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.