Nose job recipients may want to consider chin augmentation as well

Oct 05, 2009

In order to ensure an aesthetically-balanced face, surgeons performing rhinoplasty should also assess the patient's need for chin augmentation, according to new research presented at the 2009 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO, in San Diego, CA. In fact, the research suggests that the focus on what complications may arise has changed.

The chin and nose form an important part of a patient's profile, and according to the authors, not addressing it could contribute to post operative disappointment with the rhinoplasty.

The study's authors evaluated pictures of their institution's 100 most recent patients to undergo rhinoplasty, using four popular assessment methods (Silver, Legan, Merriford, and Gonzales-Ulloa). Based on these evaluations, between 17 and 62 percent of men, and 39 and 81 percent of women could have benefitted from further assessment with a view to chin augmentation. Twenty-one percent of men scored positive on three or more methods, 58 percent for women.

The authors contend that while the "perfect face" is a misnomer, balanced features are nonetheless valued in all cultures, and reflect substantially a patient's physical impression on others. In cases where surgical modifications are made, the authors believe the surgeon has a responsibility to inform their patients of the impact the procedure will have on their overall look prior to the surgery.

Source: American Academy of Otolaryngology

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