Women living in group homes need to learn to make decisions about leisure time to enrich their lives

Sep 23, 2009

Most people don't think twice about the ability to choose the movie they want to watch, the book they want to read or with whom they will have coffee. But what if you didn't have the choice, or were never taught how to make decisions regarding leisure activities? That's the reality for some women living in group homes according to a new study from the University of Alberta.

Brenda Rossow-Kimball, who did post-graduate research with Donna Goodwin, in the Faculty of and Recreation, investigated the leisure experiences of five with intellectual disabilities in two group homes. They found major differences in how leisure was experienced in each group home. In one, the women were provided with support and encouraged to make their own decisions about how they used their leisure time; there was a genuine interest in the women engaging in independent spontaneous leisure, according to Rossow-Kimball. In the other home leisure was supervised by the staff, scheduled into the activities of the home, and managed by the staff, which, the researchers say, doesn't teach the women how to discover what they like to do for leisure.

The stark contrast of self-directed leisure against staff-directed leisure time concerned both researchers because the women in the study are approaching retirement and will soon have a lot of free time on their hands.

"If we don't provide people with the opportunity to experience choice and to learn skills, their long-awaited time could be quite empty," said Goodwin.

The findings are published in Adapted Quarterly.

Source: University of Alberta (news : web)

Explore further: New study examines disparities in Medicaid spending on children in the welfare system

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Physical activity -- not just a 'walk in the park'

Jun 10, 2008

People with more green space in their living environment walk and cycle less often and for shorter amounts of time, according to new research published today in the open access journal BMC Public Health.

Hatha yoga practice and fear of falling in older adults

Mar 09, 2009

Indiana University researchers found promising results in an exploratory study involving yoga practice by older adults who expressed a fear of falling. After a 12-week, twice weekly hatha yoga class, taught by a professional ...

Recommended for you

Computer screening could help patients and healthcare

33 minutes ago

A trial of a new patient care model, which uses over-the-phone consultations and computers to help better understand the needs of the patient, has begun this week, led by researchers at the University of Adelaide.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Computer screening could help patients and healthcare

A trial of a new patient care model, which uses over-the-phone consultations and computers to help better understand the needs of the patient, has begun this week, led by researchers at the University of Adelaide.

In the 'slime jungle' height matters

(Phys.org) —In communities of microbes, akin to 'slime jungles', cells evolve not just to grow faster than their rivals but also to push themselves to the surface of colonies where they gain the best access ...

Robot scouts rooms people can't enter

(Phys.org) —Firefighters, police officers and military personnel are often required to enter rooms with little information about what dangers might lie behind the door. A group of engineering students at ...

New alfalfa variety resists ravenous local pest

(Phys.org) —Cornell plant breeders have released a new alfalfa variety with some resistance against the alfalfa snout beetle, which has ravaged alfalfa fields in nine northern New York counties and across ...