Laughter Differs In Children With Autism

Jul 10, 2009

According to a recent paper entitled "Laughter Differs in Children with Autism: An Acoustic Analysis of Laughter Produced by Children with and without the Disorder" in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, children diagnosed with autism produce different laughs than their nonautistic peers.

“We revealed that with produce very engaging laughs that we call ‘voiced’ laughs,” said William Hudenko, the lead author on the paper and assistant professor of psychology at Ithaca College.

The study recorded during a series of playful interactions with an examiner. The results showed that children with autism exhibited only one type of laughter, compared to two types of laughter for nonautistic children. There was no difference in laugh duration, frequency, change in or number of laughs per interaction.

“We hypothesized that children with autism may be expressing laughter primarily in response to positive internal states, rather than using laughter to negotiate social interactions,” said Hudenko.

Hudenko specializes in child and family clinical psychology. His clinical experience involves children who have developmental disorders and disruptive behavior disorders.

More information: www.springerlink.com/content/kn54147684771vm0/

Provided by Ithaca College (news : web)

Explore further: Culture influences incidence of depression

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study shows out laughter is contagious

Dec 13, 2006

Laughter is said to be contagious and now British scientists studying how the brain responds to emotive sounds believe they understand why.

Scientists study origins of laughter

Nov 22, 2005

Binghamton University scientists have posited the evolutionary origins of types of laughter -- stimulus-driven and that which is self-generated.

Mental disorders in parents linked to autism in children

May 05, 2008

Parents of children with autism were roughly twice as likely to have been hospitalized for a mental disorder, such as schizophrenia, than parents of other children, according to an analysis of Swedish birth and hospital records ...

No link found between autism and celiac disease

May 01, 2007

Contrary to previous studies, autistic children are no more likely than other children to have celiac disease, according to new research that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 59th Annual Meeting ...

Epilepsy drug may increase risk of autism in children

Dec 01, 2008

A new study shows that women who take the epilepsy drug valproate while pregnant may significantly increase their child's risk of developing autism. The preliminary research is published in the December 2, 2008, print issue ...

Recommended for you

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.