US teens spend more time watching TV than on computer

Jun 26, 2009
A customer looks at a display of televisions in San Francisco, California. American teenagers spend most of their free time glued to their computer screens, right? Not according to a new study. They spend much more time glued to the television set.

American teenagers spend most of their free time glued to their computer screens, right? Not according to a new study. They spend much more time glued to the television set.

That US spend more time watching television than on the computer was among the findings in a Nielsen Co. study presented at a marketing conference in New York on Thursday entitled "What Teens Want."

The study found that teenagers were more engaged than popularly believed with traditional media such as live television, radio and newspapers.

"Sure, they are the digital natives, super-communicators and multi-taskers we hear so much about, but they are also the TV viewers, newspaper readers and radio listeners that some assume they are not," the study said.

It said that teens "embrace new media not at the cost of traditional media but in supplement to it."

"Looking at our research across markets and media, we see that, contrary to popular assumption, teens are actually pretty normal in their usage," said Nic Covey, Nielsen's director of insights.

The Nielsen study found that the amount of television watched by the typical American teenager has increased by six percent over the past five years to three hours and 20 minutes per day.

The typical teenager spends 104 hours and 24 minutes per month watching and 11 hours and 32 minutes online per month, it said.

While online, teens are spending an increasing amount of time watching online video, according to the study.

It said that 12 million US teens, or about two-thirds of those online, watched online video in May 2009 averaging three hours and six minutes per month.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Regulating legal marijuana could be guided by lessons from alcohol and tobacco, study says

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Americans spend eight hours a day on screens

Mar 27, 2009

Adult Americans spend an average of more than eight hours a day in front of screens -- televisions, computer monitors, cellphones or other devices, according to a new study.

Start school later in the morning, say sleepy teens

May 20, 2007

A survey of sleep-deprived teens finds they think that a later start time for school and tests given later in the school day would result in better grades. The survey was presented at the American Thoracic Society 2007 International ...

Recommended for you

AMA examines economic impact of physicians

19 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Physicians who mainly engage in patient care contribute a total of $1.6 trillion in economic output, according to the American Medical Association (AMA)'s Economic Impact Study.

Less-schooled whites lose longevity, study finds

19 hours ago

Barbara Gentry slowly shifts her heavy frame out of a chair and uses a walker to move the dozen feet to a chair not far from the pool table at the Buford Senior Center. Her hair is white and a cough sometimes interrupts her ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

19 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.

User comments : 0

More news stories