US teens spend more time watching TV than on computer

Jun 26, 2009
A customer looks at a display of televisions in San Francisco, California. American teenagers spend most of their free time glued to their computer screens, right? Not according to a new study. They spend much more time glued to the television set.

American teenagers spend most of their free time glued to their computer screens, right? Not according to a new study. They spend much more time glued to the television set.

That US spend more time watching television than on the computer was among the findings in a Nielsen Co. study presented at a marketing conference in New York on Thursday entitled "What Teens Want."

The study found that teenagers were more engaged than popularly believed with traditional media such as live television, radio and newspapers.

"Sure, they are the digital natives, super-communicators and multi-taskers we hear so much about, but they are also the TV viewers, newspaper readers and radio listeners that some assume they are not," the study said.

It said that teens "embrace new media not at the cost of traditional media but in supplement to it."

"Looking at our research across markets and media, we see that, contrary to popular assumption, teens are actually pretty normal in their usage," said Nic Covey, Nielsen's director of insights.

The Nielsen study found that the amount of television watched by the typical American teenager has increased by six percent over the past five years to three hours and 20 minutes per day.

The typical teenager spends 104 hours and 24 minutes per month watching and 11 hours and 32 minutes online per month, it said.

While online, teens are spending an increasing amount of time watching online video, according to the study.

It said that 12 million US teens, or about two-thirds of those online, watched online video in May 2009 averaging three hours and six minutes per month.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: US sues Gerber over claims on infant formula

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Americans spend eight hours a day on screens

Mar 27, 2009

Adult Americans spend an average of more than eight hours a day in front of screens -- televisions, computer monitors, cellphones or other devices, according to a new study.

Start school later in the morning, say sleepy teens

May 20, 2007

A survey of sleep-deprived teens finds they think that a later start time for school and tests given later in the school day would result in better grades. The survey was presented at the American Thoracic Society 2007 International ...

Recommended for you

AMA 'Code of Ethics' offers guidance for physicians

1 hour ago

(HealthDay)—The American Medical Association (AMA) Code of Ethics and other articles provide guidance for physicians in relation to public health emergencies, according to a report from the AMA.

Pot-infused edibles: One toke over the line in Colorado?

5 hours ago

Marijuana shops have sprouted across Denver ever since Colorado legalized the drug for adults in January, but the popularity of pot-infused edibles has surprised authorities, and parents are seeking a ban ahead of Halloween.

US sues Gerber over claims on infant formula

7 hours ago

U.S. government regulators announced Thursday they were suing Gerber, the well-known baby food maker, for claiming that its Good Start Gentle formula can prevent or reduce allergies in children.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.