Researchers develop brain-scanning process that holds promise for epilepsy treatments (w/Video)

May 19, 2009

University of Minnesota McKnight professor and Director of Center for Neuroengineering Bin He has developed a new technique that has led to preliminary successes in noninvasive imaging of seizure foci. He's technique promises to play an important role in the treatment of epileptic seizures.

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U of M researcher develops brain-scanning process that could lead to major breakthroughs in epilepsy treatments. This video explains the procedure.

His research, called Functional Neuroimaging, has completed its first round of testing in data collected at the Mayo Clinic. He's medical device images the brain while epilepsy patients have a and then allows surgeons to identify the network where the seizure is caused.

Approximately one-third of people who suffer from epileptic seizures cannot be treated by medication, and this process could lead to further advancements in surgical treatment.

Source: University of Minnesota (news : web)

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