Hispanics appear to face poorer quality nursing home care

Apr 10, 2009

Nursing homes serving primarily Hispanic residents provided poorer quality care compared to facilities whose patients were mostly white, according to Brown University research. Details were published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association.

Researchers reached their conclusions after looking at the rate of bed sores at with high concentrations of Hispanic patients, compared to others with low concentrations. Hispanics at nursing homes with a high rate of Hispanic residents were more likely to have bed sores, compared to Hispanics living in nursing homes with fewer Hispanic residents.

Michael Gerardo, adjunct assistant professor of at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, led the research. Two others served as co-authors — Joan Teno, M.D., professor of community health and medicine and an expert on end-of-life care, and Vincent Mor, chair of the Department of Community Health, whose work focuses on nursing home care among other areas.

Gerardo and the other professors said that more research is needed to determine the implications of their findings, directed specifically at the root cause for disparities between high-quality and low-quality nursing homes.

"A systemic evaluation of the difference in the process of care between high- and low-quality nursing homes is warranted in order to reduce nursing home ," Gerardo said.

Their work comes less than two years after a landmark 2007 study, published in , that suggests blacks are more likely than whites to live in poor-quality nursing homes. That study found that the problem was worst in the Midwest, and that inequalities in care are closely correlated to racial segregation. Mor was lead author for that study.

For the study of Hispanics in nursing homes, the researchers looked at two data sources. One, the national repository of the Minimum Data Set, is a federally mandated report of health status, function and demographics on all nursing home residents. The other, which is known as the Oscar database system, collects information on patients and nursing homes, via the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services.

Residents were included if they were age 65 or older, living at free-standing nursing homes in California, New Mexico, Texas, Arizona or Colorado.

Source: Brown University (news : web)

Explore further: Walking or cycling to work improves wellbeing, researchers find

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Pandemic flu: Most nursing homes don't have a plan

Jul 22, 2008

If an influenza pandemic hits the United States, acute care hospitals are likely to be overwhelmed. Nursing homes may then be expected to assist with the patient overflow, but a new study in the Journal of the American Me ...

Nursing homes a popular option in Taiwan

Jul 24, 2008

Dr Szu-Yao (Zoe) Wang, who recently completed her PhD with UQ's School of Nursing, found that in Taiwan, where the culture dictates that children should care for their parents, aged-care facilities are becoming more popular.

Zinc may reduce pneumonia risk in nursing home elderly

Oct 22, 2007

When elderly nursing home residents contract pneumonia, it is a blow to their already fragile health. Simin Nikbin Meydani, DVM, PhD of the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University and ...

Recommended for you

Vitamin E intake critical during 'the first 1,000 days'

2 hours ago

Amid conflicting reports about the need for vitamin E and how much is enough, a new analysis published today suggests that adequate levels of this essential micronutrient are especially critical for the very ...

Demographics impact family physicians' care of children

Sep 12, 2014

(HealthDay)—Demographic and geographic factors influence whether family physicians provide care for children, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Estimate: 3 in 10 NFL retirees face cognitive woes (Update)

Sep 12, 2014

Nearly three in 10 former NFL players will develop at least moderate neurocognitive problems and qualify for payments under the proposed $765 million concussion settlement, according to data prepared for ex-players' lawyers ...

User comments : 0