Philip Morris must pay widow 145 million USD: high court

Mar 31, 2009

The US Supreme Court on Tuesday dismissed cigarette giant Philip Morris's appeal of a multi-million dollar punitive damage verdict awarded to the widow of a longtime smoker who died of lung cancer.

In a terse, one-sentence ruling, the US high court dismissed the appeal as "improvidently granted," and allowed to stand a decade-old penalty imposed against the company by a jury in the northwestern state of Oregon.

At issue is a 79.5 million dollar judgment upheld by the Oregon high court to widow Mayola Williams, whose late husband Jesse had been a two-pack-a-day smoker of Marlboros cigarette, the premier Philip Morris brand.

Over the years, the US high court has heard three appeals of the 1999 verdict, which in the meantime has ballooned to nearly double the original sum because of compounding interest, and now totals some 145 million dollars.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Experts: Chopin's heart shows signs of TB

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Court Denies Vonage Bid for Patent Case Retrial

May 04, 2007

A U.S. appeals court denies a request by Internet phone company Vonage Holdings that it order a retrial in the patent infringement case brought against it by Verizon Communications.

Yahoo! loses French Nazi goods case

Jan 13, 2006

Yahoo! lost trying to get a U.S. court to intervene over a French ruling regarding the sale of Nazi memorabilia on its Web site.

Recommended for you

Experts: Chopin's heart shows signs of TB

15 hours ago

The preserved heart of composer Frederic Chopin contains signs of tuberculosis and possibly some other lung disease, medical experts said Wednesday.

The argument in favor of doping

18 hours ago

Ahead of Friday's court ruling on whether ASADA's investigation into the Essendon Football Club was lawful, world leader in practical and medical ethics Professor Julian Savulescu, looks at whether there is a role for performance-enhancing ...

Errata frequently seen in medical literature

Sep 16, 2014

(HealthDay)—Errata, including those that may materially change the interpretation of data, are frequent in medical publications, according to a study published in the August issue of The American Journal of ...

User comments : 0