Modern lifestyle prevents tooth decay

Feb 26, 2009

New research has found that modern lifestyle habits may play a bigger role than food alone, when it comes to tooth decay.

A review of the scientific evidence over the past 150 years found that the effects of fluoride toothpaste, good oral hygiene and health education, may override the effects of food alone on tooth decay. The research is published online in a Supplement to the journal Obesity Reviews.

Professor Monty Duggal, an author of the review explained 'Nowadays, it's not enough to just look at what we eat when talking about tooth decay, as other factors seem to be as important. Fluoride toothpaste changes the effect that some foods have on the teeth, as do other good oral hygiene practices'.

He added 'Future research should investigate a number of lifestyle factors together with different foods that might affect tooth decay. Times have changed and with that, the foods we eat, and how we care for our teeth'.

Professor Duggal is a consultant and head of paediatric dentistry at Leeds dental institute. He has published over 65 research papers in international scientific journals.

The overall aim of the review was to look at the evidence for the claim that sugar was the main cause of dental caries (tooth decay). The authors concluded that out of 31 studies carefully reviewed, the majority did not find a relationship between the amount of sugar consumed and dental caries, but the frequency of consumption may be important.

Thanks to dental health education most people now know the best way to prevent tooth decay is to brush with fluoride toothpaste twice a day, especially before going to bed. Rates of tooth decay have fallen dramatically over the past 20 years.

Source: The Sugar Bureau

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VOR
not rated yet Feb 26, 2009
floridated toothpaste is okay because you spit it out and its going where it needs to go. But there is no credible evidence that floridated water, contrary to the propaganda, has much or any positive affect on tooth enamel health (or body bone health) and it is a poison. Wells with excessive flourine cause severe disease. If you have credible evidence to contrary, please provide.

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