Nasal Spray May End Dental Needle Injections for Upper Teeth Repair

Feb 17, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- A nasal spray shown to numb the upper jaw is set to be tested in an FDA Phase 3 trial, which will assess the spray's effectiveness compared to the current "gold standard" treatment -- painful anesthesia injections.

"A successful trial of this new dental anesthetic will change dental technology worldwide," said Sebastian Ciancio, D.D.S., University at Buffalo SUNY Distinguished Service Professor and chair of the Department of Periodontics and Endodontics.

Ciancio directed the Phase 2 trial and will coordinate the Phase 3 trial. Between 6 and10 million dental needle injections are given daily, according to Ciancio.

Results of the FDA Phase 2 trial, conducted in 48 subjects at the UB School of Dental Medicine, showed that the spray appears to be safe and effective.

The Phase 3 trial will be carried out later in 2009 at the UB dental school and other clinical sites. Ciancio said that if the Phase 3 trial is successful, it may mean the end of injections for any dental work performed on the upper teeth.

Ciancio and colleagues conducted the initial preliminary dental studies using the nasal spray, which is being developed by St. Renatus, LLC, based in Fort Collins, Colo.

The nasal spray formula being tested is related to a drug used by ear, nose and throat physicians when they operate on the nose. Patients who received this anesthetic reported that their upper teeth felt numb, sparking interest in using the anesthetic for dental procedures. The spray is effective only on the upper teeth.

Provided by University at Buffalo

Explore further: US aims to cut antibiotic use

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Flocks of starlings ride the wave to escape

4 hours ago

Why does it seem as if a dark band ripples through a flock of European starlings that are steering clear of a falcon or a hawk? It all lies in the birds' ability to quickly and repeatedly dip to one side to avoid being attacked. ...

Blue Freedom uses power of flowing water to charge

4 hours ago

Good friends may decide to tell you something that is not true but nonetheless sustaining: Nothing is impossible. That was the case of Blue Freedom co-founder who asked his friend if it would be possible ...

Recommended for you

US aims to cut antibiotic use

19 hours ago

US President Barack Obama on Friday rolled out plans to cut inappropriate antibiotic use by half, in an effort to tackle drug resistance.

Questions over value of new antibiotics to tackle resistance

Mar 26, 2015

In the first installment of a new series, Peter Doshi, Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and Associate Editor at The BMJ, asks why authorities are approving drugs with little evidence they d ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.