Cancer survival rates impact type of Web communities used by patients

Nov 18, 2008

Online support communities for high survival rate cancers contain a greater amount of emotional support content than online support communities for cancers with low survival rates, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Health System and the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System.

The researchers also found that support communities for low survival rate cancers contain a greater amount of informational support content than online support communities for high survival rate cancers.

"Online communities have become an important resource for individuals seeking emotional and informational social support related to cancer," says senior author Caroline Richardson, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan Health System.

The study—led by Lorraine Buis, Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System—assessed differences in emotional and informational social support content in online communities for cancers with high and low survival rates.

The researchers also found that, overall, emotional support was more prevalent than informational support across all communities and all types of cancers.

Both emotional and informational support is widely available within online communities for cancer, but not all of these sites are created equally, Buis notes.

"When primary care providers refer individuals to online communities for support, they should be aware that there might be differing amounts of support based on the survival rare of a particular cancer," she says. Buis also explains that not only are such online communities for patients, "but they help family and friends cope with the struggles that cancer presents."

Until Richardson's and Buis's most recent study, there had been no previous research on the influence of patients' cancer survival rates on social support content within online support communities for cancer.

Source: University of Michigan

Explore further: Brain tumor causes and risk factors elude scientists

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

This is why some urban legends go viral

Jun 30, 2014

Urban legends get around, but we don't really understand why. We conducted a study to explain how misinformation spreads surprisingly fast and why people feel compelled to share it.

Sri Lanka better prepared for future tsunamis

Jun 20, 2014

Vulnerable coastal communities in Sri Lanka now have more tools to help them survive tsunamis, cyclones, and other rapid-onset natural disasters. This increased preparedness flows from IDRC-supported research that evaluated ...

Recommended for you

Is Europe putting cancer research at risk?

2 hours ago

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), the leading pan-European association representing medical oncology professionals, has expressed concern that the proposed EU General Data Protection Regulation could make ...

Ascertaining low-dose radiation impact on the heart

2 hours ago

We are all exposed to radiations. Such exposure can be harmless at very low doses but damage our health above certain thresholds. But what happens in between is more difficult to predict. The PROCARDIO project is casting ...

User comments : 0