Joyful music may promote heart health

Nov 11, 2008

Listening to your favorite music may be good for your cardiovascular system. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore have shown for the first time that the emotions aroused by joyful music have a healthy effect on blood vessel function.

Music, selected by study participants because it made them feel good and brought them a sense of joy, caused tissue in the inner lining of blood vessels to dilate (or expand) in order to increase blood flow. This healthy response matches what the same researchers found in a 2005 study of laughter. On the other hand, when study volunteers listened to music they perceived as stressful, their blood vessels narrowed, producing a potentially unhealthy response that reduces blood flow.

The results of the study, conducted at the University of Maryland Medical Center, will be presented at the Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association, on November 11, 2008, in New Orleans.

"We had previously demonstrated that positive emotions, such as laughter, were good for vascular health. So, a logical question was whether other emotions, such as those evoked by music, have a similar effect," says principal investigator Michael Miller, M.D., director of preventive cardiology at the University of Maryland Medical Center and associate professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. "We knew that individual people would react differently to different types of music, so in this study, we enabled participants to select music based upon their likes and dislikes."

Study design

Ten healthy, non-smoking volunteers (70 percent male, average age 36 years) participated in all phases of the randomized study. There were four phases. In one, volunteers listened to music they selected that evoked joy. The volunteers brought recordings of their favorite music to the laboratory, or, if they did not own the music, the investigators acquired the recordings. Another phase included listening to a type of music that the volunteers said made them feel anxious. In a third session, audio tapes to promote relaxation were played and in a fourth, participants were shown videotapes designed to induce laughter.

Each volunteer participated in each of the four phases, but the order in which each phase occurred was determined at random.

To minimize emotional desensitization, the volunteers were told to avoid listening to their favorite music for a minimum of two weeks. "The idea here was that when they listened to this music that they really enjoyed, they would get an extra boost of whatever emotion was being generated," says Dr. Miller.

Prior to each phase of the study, the volunteers fasted overnight and were given a baseline test to measure what is known as flow-mediated dilation.

This test can be used to determine how the endothelium (the lining of blood vessels) responds to a wide range of stimuli, from exercise to emotions to medications. The endothelium has a powerful effect on blood vessel tone and regulates blood flow, adjusts coagulation and blood thickening, and secretes chemicals and other substances in response to wounds, infections or irritation. It also plays an important role in the development of cardiovascular disease.

During the blood vessel dilation test, blood flow in the brachial artery, located in the upper arm, is restricted by a blood pressure cuff and released. An ultrasound device measures how well the blood vessel responds to the sudden increase in flow, with the result expressed as a percentage change in vessel diameter.

After the baseline test, each volunteer was exposed to the music or humorous video for 30 minutes. Additional dilation measurements were obtained throughout each phase to assess changes from baseline. Participants returned a minimum of one week later for the next phase. Sixteen measurements per person or a total of 160 dilation measurements were taken during the course of the study, which took six to eight months to complete.

Study results

Compared to baseline, the average upper arm blood vessel diameter increased 26 percent after the joyful music phase, while listening to music that caused anxiety narrowed blood vessels by six percent. "I was impressed with the highly significant differences both before and after listening to joyful music as well as between joyful and anxious music," says Dr. Miller.

During the laughter phase of the study, a 19 percent increase in dilation showed a significant trend. The relaxation phase increased dilation by 11 percent on average; a number that the investigators determined was not statistically significant.

Most of the participants in the study selected country music as their favorite to evoke joy, according to Dr. Miller, while they said "heavy metal" music made them feel anxious. "You can't read into this too much, although you could argue that country music is light, spirited, a lot of love songs." says Dr. Miller, who enjoys rock, classical, jazz and country music. He says he could have selected 10 other individuals and the favorite could have been a different type of music.

Could other types of music produce similar positive effects on blood vessels? It's possible, according to Dr. Miller. "The answer, in my opinion, is how an individual is 'wired.' We're all wired differently, we all react differently. I enjoy country music, so I could appreciate why country music could cause that joyful response," he says.

Dr. Miller believes that a physiological reaction to the type of music is behind the formation of positive and negative blood vessel reaction. "We don't understand why somebody may be drawn to certain classical music, for example. There are no words in that, and yet the rhythm, the melody and harmony, may all play a role in the emotional and cardiovascular response."

That physiological impact may also affect the activity of brain chemicals called endorphins. "The emotional component may be an endorphin-mediated effect," says Dr. Miller. "The active listening to music evokes such raw positive emotions likely in part due to the release of endorphins, part of that mind-heart connection that we yearn to learn so much more about. Needless to say, these results were music to my ears because they signal another preventive strategy that we may incorporate in our daily lives to promote heart health."

Source: University of Maryland

Explore further: Tips offered to docs, spouses for maintaining happy marriage

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Broadcasters adapt to Web, but fear its encroachment

May 19, 2010

Last fall, Apple Inc.'s head of Internet services began making the Hollywood rounds with a proposal to launch a subscription television service that would offer a package of broadcast shows for $10 a month.

Vampire mania a perpetual fad in pop culture

Oct 27, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- They're everywhere. Like knee boots, capes and cloaks, vampires are trendy again. In books and movies, on magazine covers, TV and the Internet -- it's hard to avoid blood suckers in the media lately.

What's in store for the centenarians of the next millennium?

Oct 12, 2009

Today's babies will be tomorrow's centenarians. A new report says that reaching the age of 100 may become ordinary for most American babies born since 2000. How will living for a century affect our kids? And what quality ...

Recommended for you

Mobile phones monitor vaccine response

18 minutes ago

WA researchers used mobile phone text messages to implement a real-time safety monitoring program for pregnant women immunised with trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV).

China punishes hospital for operating room photos

1 hour ago

Chinese health authorities put a hospital president on probation and fired three other supervisors following public outrage over photos posted online of smiling medical staff posing with patients in the middle of surgery.

Abandoned asbestos mines still a hazard in India

3 hours ago

Asbestos waste spills in a gray gash down the flank of a lush green hill above tribal villages in eastern India. Three decades after the mines were abandoned, nothing has been done to remove the enormous, ...

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Truth
3.4 / 5 (7) Nov 11, 2008
Ten minutes of a hot chick doing a lap dance on your privates gives every single one of the above stated benefits twice over. Why in God's name doesn't any research organization have the balls to come out and say so? They have known about this phenomenon for years, but because of "moral" and "religious" concerns, have kept their mouths shut and cow-towed to the "reverends" who insist that they speak for God....Sometimes I think that we are still living in the 12th century...
pysch101
1.3 / 5 (4) Nov 11, 2008
Ten minutes of a hot chick doing a lap dance on your privates gives every single one of the above stated benefits twice over. Why in God's name doesn't any research organization have the balls to come out and say so? They have known about this phenomenon for years, but because of "moral" and "religious" concerns, have kept their mouths shut and cow-towed to the "reverends" who insist that they speak for God....Sometimes I think that we are still living in the 12th century...


K, reason #1: They don't want kids having kids all the time.
reason #2: that's just getting desperate for those emotions. there is most of the time risk of pregnancy. we don't need a baby boom right now in our current state..... you keep saying in God's name, yet you don't believe in Him... why even bothering saying His name??? think about it. teens would say to their parents: it's okay for me to do it, scientists say it's healthy for me. next thing you know teens will be pregnant everywhere, daddies of the girls will want a lawsuit or a restraining order, or something to get back at the boy responsible. also with the scientists say it's health for me, less protection will be used. that a way it will feel even better. think before you comment..... with the whole in God's name thing, I don't say what in Buddha's name is going on here. b/c i dont believe in buddha. why even bother wasting your breath or typing???? Think before taking action.
PieRSquare
5 / 5 (1) Nov 12, 2008
Wow, looks like the previous posters have their own happiness issues. I think I'll get off the forums and go play some Hendrix...
D666
not rated yet Nov 12, 2008
Wow, looks like the previous posters have their own happiness issues. I think I'll get off the forums and go play some Hendrix...


Yeah, I'm beginning to wonder if they finally shut down usenet, and all the looney tunes are looking for a new home. Certainly the posting quality on physorg has deteriorated lately.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.