Academic health centers should take lead in promoting the sharing of biomedical research data

Sep 02, 2008

Academic health centers (AHCs) have a critical role in enabling, encouraging, and rewarding the sharing of biomedical research data, say a team of academics in this week's PLoS Medicine. "The leaders of medical schools and academic-affiliated hospitals," they say "can play a unique role in supporting this transformation of the research enterprise."

Rebecca Crowley (University of Pittsburgh Medical School, USA) and colleagues argue that despite the anticipated benefits of data sharing, such sharing has "yet to be widely adopted in biomedicine" and they urge AHCs to take a leadership role. "Through their interwoven roles in education, research, and policy, AHCs can lead the development of best practices for establishing a data sharing culture."

The authors lay out 7 recommendations for AHCs to encourage data sharing:

-- Commit to sharing research data as openly as possible, given privacy constraints, and streamline policies and procedures relating to institutional review boards (research ethics committees), technology transfer, and information technology
-- Recognize data sharing contributions in staff hiring and promotion decisions
-- Educate trainees and current investigators on responsible data sharing
-- Encourage data sharing practices as part of publication policies
-- Encourage data sharing plans as part of funding policies
-- Fund the costs of data sharing, support for data repositories, adoption of sharing infrastructure and metrics, and research into best practices through federal grants and AHC funds
-- Publish experiences in data sharing to facilitate the exchange of best practices.

"Academic health centers will benefit by leading the transition towards a culture of biomedical data sharing," conclude the authors. "More widespread awareness of these benefits can motivate key stakeholders to take concrete steps to enable, inspire, and reward data sharing within and beyond their institutions."

Source: Public Library of Science

Explore further: Startup commercializing innovation to reduce neurotoxin that damages nerve cells, triggers pain

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US poverty rate dipped slightly in 2013

20 minutes ago

The number of people living in poverty in the United States dropped slightly in 2013 to 45.3 million, according to figures released Tuesday by the Census Bureau.

Tornadoes occurring earlier in 'Tornado Alley'

33 minutes ago

Peak tornado activity in the central and southern Great Plains of the United States is occurring up to two weeks earlier than it did half a century ago, according to a new study whose findings could help ...

And so they beat on, flagella against the cantilever

35 minutes ago

A team of researchers at Boston University and Stanford University School of Medicine has developed a new model to study the motion patterns of bacteria in real time and to determine how these motions relate ...

Recommended for you

Cellular protein may be key to longevity

Sep 15, 2014

Researchers have found that levels of a regulatory protein called ATF4, and the corresponding levels of the molecules whose expression it controls, are elevated in the livers of mice exposed to multiple interventions ...

Gut bacteria tire out T cells

Sep 15, 2014

Leaky intestines may cripple bacteria-fighting immune cells in patients with a rare hereditary disease, according to a study by researchers in Lausanne, Switzerland. The study, published in The Journal of Experimental Me ...

T-bet tackles hepatitis

Sep 15, 2014

A single protein may tip the balance between ridding the body of a dangerous virus and enduring life-long chronic infection, according to a report appearing in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

User comments : 0