AIDS experts go back to basics

Mar 27, 2008

The head of the U.S. agency in charge of AIDS research says scientists need to go back to basics to find a vaccine against the HIV virus.

Dr. Anthony S. Fauci of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said the agency will re-evaluate the use of the $1.5 billion it spends on AIDS research, The New York Times reported Wednesday. He said more basic laboratory research is needed to understand the way the body and experimental vaccines respond to HIV.

"There is not an immediate solution to the problem," Fauci told the newspaper at a summit Tuesday in Bethesda, Md., to discuss fallout from last year's failure of the most promising candidate for an HIV vaccine.

Fauci rejected the AIDS Health Care Foundation's call for the suspension of money for HIV vaccine research in favor of increased AIDS prevention efforts. "Under no circumstances will we stop AIDS vaccine research," he said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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User comments : 2

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sheber
4 / 5 (1) Mar 27, 2008
How far are they planning to go back? http://www.uow.ed...ts/AIDS/
Sepp
not rated yet Mar 28, 2008
Sheber,

just my question. How far are they willing to go back. Is HIV as an agent of causation also part of the question?

http://www.newmed...rror.htm

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