What is the life cycle of salmonella enteritidis like in the internal organs?

Mar 18, 2008

The Incidence of Salmonella enteritidis infection is common in hospitals for children and the elderly, and amongst immuno-suppressed individuals.

Salmonella enteritidis can be transmitted to humans through the food production chain. In China and other countries, for example, the consumption of poultry products is a high risk factor and Salmonella enteritidis infection in poultry industry has been rising dramatically in recent years. This increased prevalence of Salmonella enteritidis makes knowing more about its complex life cycle and identifying the regular distribution pattern of Salmonella enteritidis in the internal organs very important.

To learn more about the infection pattern, Dr. Cheng and his colleagues at the Sichuan Agricultural University China used a serovar specific real time PCR for the detection and quantification of Salmonella enteritidis in the internal organs of mice.

Based on their results, the copy number of Salmonella enteritidis DNA in each tissue reached a peak at 24C 36 h PI, with the liver and spleen containing high concentrations of Salmonella enteritidis, whereas the blood, heart, kidney, pancreas, and gallbladder showed low concentrations. Salmonella enteritidis populations began to decrease and were not detectable at 3 d PI, but were still present up to 12 d PI in the gallbladder, after two weeks for the liver, and after three weeks for the spleen without causing apparent symptoms.

Interestingly, the gallbladder is a site of carriage in this study, it is also the storage site for bile. This study may be the first time it has been reported that Salmonella enteritidis can persist for as long as 12 d PI in the gallbladder of mice. The gallbladder appeared to show gross lesion (such as swelling) at 20 h to 2 d PI. Importantly, there were no significant gross lesions over the 3 d¨C12 d PI period, although there was nearly the same number of S. enteritidis cells over the 12 d period.

Last but not least, rapid identification of Salmonella enteritidis based on a specific real-time PCR amplifying species specific DNA sequence is a wonderful tool for clinical diagnosis.

The authors believe that this study will help to increase understanding of the mechanisms of Salmonella enteritidis infection in vivo and illustrate the need for further research into how to prevent and treat Salmonella enteritidis infection, especially by developing new treatment medicines.

Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology

Explore further: Doctor behind 'free radical' aging theory dies

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Form Devices team designs Point as a house sitter

6 hours ago

A Scandinavian team "with an international outlook" and good eye for electronics, software and design aims to reach success with what they characterize as "a softer take" on home security. Their device is ...

Man pleads guilty in New York cybercrime case

9 hours ago

A California man has pleaded guilty in New York City for his role marketing malware that federal authorities say infected more than a half-million computers worldwide.

NASA issues 'remastered' view of Jupiter's moon Europa

17 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Scientists have produced a new version of what is perhaps NASA's best view of Jupiter's ice-covered moon, Europa. The mosaic of color images was obtained in the late 1990s by NASA's Galileo ...

Dish restores Turner channels to lineup

18 hours ago

Turner Broadcasting channels such as Cartoon Network and CNN are back on the Dish network after being dropped from the satellite TV provider's lineup during contract talks.

Recommended for you

Doctor behind 'free radical' aging theory dies

Nov 25, 2014

Dr. Denham Harman, a renowned scientist who developed the most widely accepted theory on aging that's now used to study cancer, Alzheimer's disease and other illnesses, has died in Nebraska at age 98.

Mexican boy who had massive tumor recovering

Nov 25, 2014

An 11-year-old Mexican boy who had pieces of a massive tumor removed and who drew international attention after U.S. officials helped him get treatment in the southwestern U.S. state of New Mexico is still recovering after ...

New medical device to make the mines safer

Nov 21, 2014

Dehydration can be a serious health issue for Australia's mining industry, but a new product to be developed with input from Flinders University's Medical Device Partnering Program (MDPP) is set to more effectively ...

US family gets $6.75 million in Botox case

Nov 20, 2014

A New York couple who said Botox treatment of their son's cerebral palsy left him with life-threatening complications and sued its manufacturer won a $6.75 million verdict from a federal jury on Thursday.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.