Doctors cool to herbal tea diabetes remedy

Nov 14, 2007

Some doctors in Texas are throwing cold water on a Mexican herbal tea some claim is a remedy for diabetes.

Dibepan is a diabetes herbal remedy that some swear changed their lives, San Antonio television station KENS reported.

Doctors, however, said they aren't so sure.

"We looked on the Web about this (and) these people are very clever, there is nothing on the Web about this. It just says that it works," Dr. Sherwyn Schwartz, an endocrinologist and diabetes researcher in the San Antonio area, told the television station.

The herbal product from Mexico went on sale in San Antonio six months ago. Made from the root bark and leaves of a tree that grows in the tropics of Mexico, dibepan's maker said it helps the pancreas process glucose normally reducing blood sugar levels.

"I feel a lot better. I have a lot more energy, and it really controls my sugar level," tea drinker Richard Sepulveda said to KENS. Others said they've stopped taking their insulin without ill effects so far, the television station reported.

"I'm not saying it doesn't work if it does work," Schwartz said. "I don't know the side effects. I don't understand it; they don't give me information."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Bangladesh jails three over drug scam that killed hundreds of children (Update)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Organismal biologists needed to interpret new trees of life

1 hour ago

Rapidly accumulating data on the molecular sequences of animal genes are overturning some standard zoological narratives about how major animal groups evolved. The turmoil means that biologists should adopt guidelines to ...

An anti-glare, anti-reflective display for mobile devices?

2 hours ago

If you've ever tried to watch a video on a tablet on a sunny day, you know you have to tilt it at just the right angle to get rid of glare or invest in a special filter. But now scientists are reporting in the journal ACS Ap ...

Recommended for you

Supermaterial gives rejected drugs a new chance

2 hours ago

More than 80 percent of all drug candidates in the pharma R&D suffer from poor solubility and are therefore rejected early in the drug discovery process. Now Uppsala University researchers show that the new ...

Risk of antibiotic overuse in aged care settings

Jul 21, 2014

Antibiotics are being overused in residential aged care facilities (RACFs), and more integrated efforts to improve antibiotic prescribing practices need to be introduced, researchers say. 

Ruconest approved for rare genetic disease

Jul 17, 2014

(HealthDay)—Ruconest has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat hereditary angioedema, a genetic disease that leads to sudden and potentially fatal swelling of the hands, feet, limbs, face, intestinal ...

NIH system to monitor emerging drug trends

Jul 17, 2014

An innovative National Drug Early Warning System (NDEWS) is being developed to monitor emerging trends that will help health experts respond quickly to potential outbreaks of illicit drugs such as heroin and to identify increased ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

mneeley
not rated yet Nov 15, 2007
I would like for the medical community to gain some interest in herbal remedies instead of giving a quick dismissal. Before you blow it out of the water. Do some research, and googling it will not fit the bill. We need real research. :) Big Pharma could benefit from this advise as well.