Doctors cool to herbal tea diabetes remedy

Nov 14, 2007

Some doctors in Texas are throwing cold water on a Mexican herbal tea some claim is a remedy for diabetes.

Dibepan is a diabetes herbal remedy that some swear changed their lives, San Antonio television station KENS reported.

Doctors, however, said they aren't so sure.

"We looked on the Web about this (and) these people are very clever, there is nothing on the Web about this. It just says that it works," Dr. Sherwyn Schwartz, an endocrinologist and diabetes researcher in the San Antonio area, told the television station.

The herbal product from Mexico went on sale in San Antonio six months ago. Made from the root bark and leaves of a tree that grows in the tropics of Mexico, dibepan's maker said it helps the pancreas process glucose normally reducing blood sugar levels.

"I feel a lot better. I have a lot more energy, and it really controls my sugar level," tea drinker Richard Sepulveda said to KENS. Others said they've stopped taking their insulin without ill effects so far, the television station reported.

"I'm not saying it doesn't work if it does work," Schwartz said. "I don't know the side effects. I don't understand it; they don't give me information."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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User comments : 1

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mneeley
not rated yet Nov 15, 2007
I would like for the medical community to gain some interest in herbal remedies instead of giving a quick dismissal. Before you blow it out of the water. Do some research, and googling it will not fit the bill. We need real research. :) Big Pharma could benefit from this advise as well.

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