Gardening may fight childhood obesity

Aug 28, 2007

A Kansas professor says gardening may be the way to fight the growing problem of childhood obesity.

Candice Shoemaker, associate professor of horticulture, forestry and recreation resources at Kansas State University, has received a $1.04 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Research Institute for Project PLANTS, or Promoting Lifelong Activity and Nutrition Through Schools.

Shoemaker and colleagues will work to create gardens -- and high tunnels for gardening during the winter months -- in a school district in Manhattan, Kan. The program will include an after-school program for fourth- and fifth-grade students to grow their own fruits, vegetables and flowers.

She said when children help to grow their own fruits and vegetables, they are more interested in eating them. Also, gardening gets children outdoors and counts as physical activity.

Shoemaker said each school will have a core group of parents, after-school staff, teachers, area master gardeners and community volunteers to help in creating the garden and taking care of it in the summer. "We hope to show how a community can work with a school to put in a garden," Shoemaker said Monday in a news release.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Jamaica Senate starts debate on pot decriminalization bill

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Jamaica Senate starts debate on pot decriminalization bill

Jan 30, 2015

Jamaica's Senate on Friday started debating a bill that would decriminalize possession of small amounts of pot and establish a licensing agency to regulate a lawful medical marijuana industry on the island where the drug ...

Can Lean Management improve hospitals?

Jan 30, 2015

Waiting times in hospital emergency departments could be cut with the introduction of Lean Management and Six Sigma techniques according to new research.

Research finds 90 percent of home chefs contaminate food

Jan 30, 2015

If you're gearing up for a big Super Bowl bash, you might want to consult the best food-handling practices before preparing that feast. New research from Kansas State University finds that most home chefs drop the ball on ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.