Study: China's regulatory system is flawed

Jul 10, 2007

A U.S. study suggests the recent discovery of contaminated Chinese food exports exposes a flawed regulatory system in that nation.

"This was bound to happen," said Professor Nancy Childs of Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. "China, like many countries, lacks a coordinated and simplistic food regulation policy. What we have here are a multitude of infractions ranging from quality and hygiene issues to criminal adulteration."

China has recently been involved in such incidents as toothpaste tainted with a deadly antifreeze agent, pet food containing melamine, lead paint used to color children's toys, and toxins discovered in seafood exports.

Childs said increasing consumer demand for bulk products at low prices is partly to blame. "When you drive things to the lowest possible price in a developing economy with minimum standards, this is what happens," she said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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