France recalls hamburgers after E. coli scare

Jun 16, 2011 By CECILE BRISSON , Associated Press

(AP) -- French health authorities ordered a recall of hamburger patties sold by a German supermarket chain after seven children were infected by the E. coli bacteria, though officials ruled out Thursday any link between the infections and a deadly outbreak of the virus in neighboring Germany.

Daniel Lenoir, who heads the health agency in France's Nord-Pas-de-Calais region, said "we are certain it's not the same that was identified on the sprouts in Germany," which killed 39 people and infected thousands of others in recent weeks.

In a news conference, Lenoir said the seven children were hospitalized with infections stemming from E. coli, which causes vomiting and severe, often bloody diarrhea. He added that five of the children are known to have eaten frozen ground beef patties made in French factory and sold by German supermarket chain Lidl.

The beef for the patties came from farms in France, Germany and the Netherlands, said the French manufacturer that supplied the meat for the patties, SEB.

The recall affects about 10 tons of meat, Guy Lamorlette of SEB told The Associated Press. He said the patties were analyzed before being delivered to supermarket distributors.

The family of one of the hospitalized children brought a box of the patties to for analysis, the co-director of Lidl France, Jerome Gresland, told the AP. He added that all the meat supplied by SEB had been removed from the supermarket chain's shelves.

European Union spokesman Frederic Vincent said the European Commission, the 27-nation bloc's executive branch, said the outbreak in France is not nearly as serious as the one in Germany.

He said the strain found in France is discovered regularly. There were 3,500 cases of E.coli in the European Union last year, 93 of which were in France, he said.

Also, Vincent said the commission was waiting for more information in order to avoid a repeat of the recent debacle, when Spanish cucumbers were wrongly blamed for the German E.coli outbreak, costing Spanish farmers significant income.

The German outbreak was eventually traced last week to sprouts from a farm in northern Germany. With more than 3,000 infections reported so far, German health officials have said the number of new infections is tailing off.

However, they are still recommending that consumers do not eat any vegetable as they try to determine how the bacteria got onto the farm - whether through workers, in seeds or by some other means like contaminated water.

Explore further: Promising new antibiotic defies conventional wisdom on treating superbug

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Germany advises against homegrown sprouts

Jun 13, 2011

(AP) -- Authorities are advising Germans not to eat raw homegrown sprouts, pointing to suspicions that the seeds may be one cause of the country's deadly E. coli outbreak.

Germany still seeking reason for E. coli outbreak

Jun 13, 2011

(AP) -- German authorities said Sunday that they haven't yet been able to resolve how sprouts at a farm became contaminated with an aggressive strain of E. coli that has been blamed for 35 deaths.

Deadly E. Coli in Germany: a timeline

Jun 10, 2011

Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), which has sparked a food-health scare in Germany, has already killed 31 people and infected 3,000 since the first cases were reported on May 24.

Cucumbers blamed for deadly German E. coli outbreak

May 26, 2011

Cucumbers from Spain have been confirmed as one of the sources responsible for an outbreak in Germany of E.Coli, a potentially lethal food-borne bacteria, the European Commission said Thursday.

Spain: Germany weighing EU aid to Spanish farmers

Jun 03, 2011

(AP) -- Germany is considering pushing for EU compensation for Spanish farmers after it erroneously blamed its vegetable produce for starting the E. coli outbreak that has killed 18 people, says Spain.

Recommended for you

5 things to know about Ebola outbreak in W. Africa

5 hours ago

(AP)—There has been panic and fear about the deadly Ebola disease spreading ever since Nigerian health officials reported Friday that a Liberian man sick with the disease had traveled to Togo and then Nigeria ...

Scissoring the lipids

6 hours ago

A new strategy which enables molecules to be disconnected essentially anywhere, even remote from functionality, is described by researchers from the University of Bristol in Nature Chemistry today. The method is now being ...

User comments : 0