Transcatheter aortic valve implantation as good as traditional surgery for high risk, operable patients

Apr 05, 2011
TAVI as good as traditional surgery for high risk, operable patients
The valve used in TAVI surgery.

Just released data from a clinical trial shows continued promise for a new minimally invasive treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. New research presented at the 2011 American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions from the first arm, Cohort A, of the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) Trial shows that transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is as good as traditional open heart surgery for high-risk, but operable patients. The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) is a participating site for the trial.

Speaking at the meeting as part of the panel presenting the data, Howard C. Herrmann, MD, director of the Interventional Cardiology and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratories at Penn, said “The results are a win-win for patients. Surgery was better than expected and TAVI was even better at 30 days and as good as surgery at one year. High risk patients with this common life threatening disease will likely soon have a less invasive alternative to . I anticipate that the results of TAVI will only get better with experience and further improvements in the technology.”

Cohort A compared outcomes after treatment with either the TAVI procedure or traditional open-heart surgery in 699 high-risk, operable patients. The study is a "non-inferiority" trial designed to evaluate whether patient outcomes after transcatheter replacement are comparable to surgical outcomes in these patients.

Researchers at the meeting cautioned that although the study met its primary endpoint of demonstrating non-inferiority to traditional surgery, major strokes and other vascular complications were higher in the TAVI-treated patients, both at 30 days and one year. By contrast, major bleeding was more than twice as common in the surgical group.

The PARTNER Trial is a randomized, controlled pivotal trial of a transcatheter aortic heart valve – a collapsible and balloon-expandable valve that can be introduced into the body via a catheter-based delivery system. The valve replaces a patient’s diseased valve without traditional open-heart surgery and while the patient’s heart continues to beat. The trial is studying the valve in both operable (Cohort A) and inoperable (Cohort B) patients with severe aortic stenosis.

Previous results from the trial indicated that this therapeutic option was viable for patients too sick to undergo traditional open-heart surgery (Cohort B). As compared to standard medical therapy, the new procedure, transcatheter aortic valve implantation significantly reduced mortality rates in the patients who received the new valve.

Explore further: Continued reliance on Windows XP in physician practices may threaten data security

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Diseased heart valve replaced through small chest incision

Feb 10, 2009

When 91-year-old Irvin Lafferty was diagnosed with severe blockage of his heart valve—hardening that is formally known as aortic valve stenosis—open-heart surgery was out of the question. He'd already survived quadruple ...

Heart valves implanted without open-heart surgery

Jan 07, 2009

An innovative approach for implanting a new aortic heart valve without open-heart surgery is being offered to patients at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center. Known as the PARTNER (Placement of ...

Recommended for you

Obese British man in court fight for surgery

Jul 11, 2011

A British man weighing 22 stone (139 kilograms, 306 pounds) launched a court appeal Monday against a decision to refuse him state-funded obesity surgery because he is not fat enough.

2008 crisis spurred rise in suicides in Europe

Jul 08, 2011

The financial crisis that began to hit Europe in mid-2008 reversed a steady, years-long fall in suicides among people of working age, according to a letter published on Friday by The Lancet.

New food labels dished up to keep Europe healthy

Jul 06, 2011

A groundbreaking deal on compulsory new food labels Wednesday is set to give Europeans clear information on the nutritional and energy content of products, as well as country of origin.

Overweight men have poorer sperm count

Jul 04, 2011

Overweight or obese men, like their female counterparts, have a lower chance of becoming a parent, according to a comparison of sperm quality presented at a European fertility meeting Monday.

User comments : 0

More news stories

New clinical trial launched for advance lung cancer

Cancer Research UK is partnering with pharmaceutical companies AstraZeneca and Pfizer to create a pioneering clinical trial for patients with advanced lung cancer – marking a new era of research into personalised medicines ...

More vets turn to prosthetics to help legless pets

A 9-month-old boxer pup named Duncan barreled down a beach in Oregon, running full tilt on soft sand into YouTube history and showing more than 4 million viewers that he can revel in a good romp despite lacking ...