Happy hour linked to pub violence

Mar 04, 2011

A Cardiff University study has established a link between pub violence and happy hour-style drinking promotions.

The findings also show that pub staff themselves need to do more to stop heavily intoxicated customers from continuing to drink.

The team studied pubs and nightclubs with a history of violence across five different cities and towns in the UK. Customers entering and leaving the premises were breathalysed. The team also recorded data about the price of beer and any drink promotions at each establishment. Their findings were then linked to police and hospital data about assaults inside or immediately outside the premises.

The team found that premises with the highest levels of violence were most likely to have:

  • The greatest change in customers' intoxication levels between entry and exit
  • Price promotions on drinks
The team also found that simple observation of customers staggering or slurring their speech was a very accurate predicator of the levels of intoxication recorded by the breathalysers.

Dr Simon Moore, of Cardiff University's award-winning Violence and Society Research Group, who led the study, said: "Our findings clearly show that and are not simply caused by drinkers' weaknesses. The way premises are run also contributes, suggesting the industry still has more to do in playing its part.

"The legislation requiring bar staff not to serve those who are already drunk should be properly enforced. Our study shows these customers are not difficult to spot - time should be called on those who can no longer walk in a straight line or who slur their speech.

"Measures to restrict and enforce sensible drinking would make night-time city centres healthier and more enjoyable spaces for everyone who uses them."

The team's findings have just been published in the journal Alcohol and Alcoholism and the Project was funded by the Medical Research Council.

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Nikola
not rated yet Mar 04, 2011
pointing out the obvious
Eikka
not rated yet Mar 04, 2011
Having been bar staff, I know how difficult it sometimes is to deny a customer a drink. If someone is too drunk and you say no, they'll sometimes start running their mouth with you, and when you've finally got them to accept that they're not getting any then you've lost five other customers, some of whom now think you're an absolute c*nt. They sympathize with the guy because they don't see how drunk he is. Then the drunkard's friends buy him a drink anyways, and you got a person with a bone to pick getting even more smashed.

It's easier if they simply get violent and the security throws them out.
damnfuct
not rated yet Mar 05, 2011
Some people are violent by nature, and alcohol just accentuates this. I've seen violent drunks just as much as I've seen extremely disarming or timid drunks.

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