Early success of anti-HIV preventive oral drug regimen is promising, but questions remain

Mar 14, 2011

The first human studies of an oral drug regimen to prevent HIV infection in high-risk individuals yielded a promising near 50% reduction in HIV incidence, but a number of issues require additional research before oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can be implemented on a large scale, according to an article in AIDS Patient Care and STDs, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

After the success of a trial of PrEP in a high risk population of men who have sex with men (MSM), expanded studies are set to begin that will enroll more than 20,000 men and women. Although PrEP comprised of a two-drug regimen (the oral antiretroviral agents tenofovir and ) was shown to be safe and effective in early clinical testing, Gavin Myers, MA and Kenneth Mayer, MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University (Providence, RI) emphasize the need for more research in several key areas: the need for ongoing PrEP clinical monitoring of side effects; the diminished preventive benefits seen in patients who do not adhere to the PrEP regimen and the need for counseling; the attitudes and awareness of physicians who would be prescribing PrEP; and the potential for intermittent PrEP to be as effective as once-daily dosing. They discuss these issues in the article, "Oral Preexposure Anti-HIV Prophylaxis for High-Risk U.S. Populations: Current Considerations in Light of New Findings."

"This is an extraordinary example of translational medicine in the service of prevention. But implementation faces major social obstacles. Adherence to a PreP regimen is key. And the cost of the drugs may make it impractical for all but the highest at-risk populations," says Jeffrey Laurence, MD, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal and Director of the Laboratory for Research at Weill Medical College of Cornell University (New York, NY).

Explore further: Home- versus mobile clinic-based HIV testing and counseling in rural Africa

More information: The article is available free online at www.liebertpub.com/apc

Provided by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Daily dose of HIV drug reduces risk of HIV infection

Nov 23, 2010

A daily dose of an oral antiretroviral drug, currently approved to treat HIV infection, reduced the risk of acquiring HIV infection by 43.8 percent among men who have sex with men. The findings, a major advance in HIV prevention ...

PrEP treatment prevented HIV transmission in humanized mice

Jan 21, 2010

Systemic pre-exposure administration of antiretroviral drugs provides protection against intravenous and rectal transmission of HIV in mice with human immune systems, according to a new study published January 21, 2010 in ...

Recommended for you

Cambodia orders probe into mass HIV infection

3 hours ago

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen on Thursday ordered a probe into an apparent mass HIV infection believed to have been spread by contaminated needles, as the number of suspected cases passed 100.

A fresh setback for efforts to cure HIV infection

16 hours ago

Researchers are reporting another disappointment for efforts to cure infection with the AIDS virus. Six patients given blood-cell transplants similar to one that cured a man known as "the Berlin patient" have ...

Cambodia village reports mass HIV/AIDS infection

Dec 16, 2014

Cambodian health authorities on Tuesday said more than 80 people—including children and the elderly—who tested positive for HIV/AIDS in a single remote village may have been infected by contaminated needles.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.