Former Duke researcher retracts lung cancer paper

Mar 02, 2011

A Duke University cancer researcher who resigned in November amid questions about his work has retracted a study in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study reported that a gene profiling test could help show which lung cancer patients most need chemotherapy.

A letter from the scientist, Anil Potti (uh-NEEL' POT'-ee), and his co-authors was published online Wednesday by the journal.

It says that the authors have not been able to reproduce the results they reported in their 2006 study. The letter says they "deeply regret" the effect this has had on other scientists.

Potti resigned amid questions about other research he led, and as the university was looking into whether he had lied on a federal grant application.

Explore further: How rare models suggest new treatment strategies

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Duke scientist's cancer research is questioned

Jul 23, 2010

(AP) -- Concerns are being raised about the validity of research done by a Duke University cancer scientist who recently was placed on leave while the school investigates whether he falsely claimed to be a Rhodes scholar.

Genomic signature of colon cancer may individualize treatment

Nov 24, 2008

Researchers in the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy have developed a model for predicting risk of recurrence in early stage colon cancer patients, and have used the model to also predict sensitivity to chemotherapy ...

China bird-flu research raises questions

Jun 23, 2006

A new China study predates the country's claim of its first human bird-flu case by two years, raising questions about the spread of the disease, a report says.

Researchers find genetic marker for repeat lung cancer

Aug 19, 2010

Current lung cancer survival statistics present a grim prognosis, but new findings could greatly impact survival rates. Researchers led by Lan Guo, Ph.D. at the West Virginia University Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center have ...

Recommended for you

Using synthetic biology to make new antibiotics

1 hour ago

Research at Victoria University of Wellington could lead to a new generation of antibiotics, helping tackle the global issue of 'superbugs' that are resistant to modern medicine.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

StoneU
not rated yet Mar 06, 2011
Every thing has a reason,and i like to know more.