Officials confirm 3 cases of cholera in NYC

Feb 06, 2011

(AP) -- New York City officials have confirmed that three New Yorkers contracted cholera while in the Dominican Republic for a wedding.

The Dominican Republic shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti, where thousands have died from the disease.

A medical epidemiologist for the city Department of Health and Mental Hygiene told The New York Times Saturday that all three people who were infected last month have recovered.

Dr. Sharon Balter says the city typically sees an average of one cholera case per year.

City health officials are now working with the in Atlanta to determine whether the current strain is similar to the one that has been raging in since October.

Three deaths have been reported in the Dominican Republic.

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