Cardiologists uncover new heart attack warning sign

Jan 06, 2011

Cardiologists at the University of Connecticut Health Center have identified a protein fragment that when detected in the blood can be a predictor of heart attack.

Their research, led by Dr. Bruce Liang, director of the Pat and Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center, is published in the Jan. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. It found patients had elevated levels of the protein fragment known as Caspase-3 p17 in their blood.

"We've discovered a new for heart attack, and showed that apoptosis, or a particular kind of , is a cause of heart muscle damage." Liang says. "The ability to see a heart attack coming with a simple blood test and to develop new therapies to block apoptosis would enable us to get a head start on treatment and preserve crucial heart muscle and cardiac function."

If it is successfully applied one day, researchers say the discovery would mean another way to diagnose heart attack and the possible development of new treatment.

Explore further: Drugs used to treat lung disease work with the body clock

More information: The article is available online at content.onlinejacc.org/cgi/reprint/57/2/220.pdf

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Novel compound may lessen heart attack damage

Feb 07, 2008

A novel drug designed to lessen muscle damage from a heart attack has passed initial safety tests at the Duke Clinical Research Institute. Results of the study, available online and to be published in the February 19 issue ...

Bleeding hearts revealed with new scan

Jan 19, 2009

Images that for the first time show bleeding inside the heart after people have suffered a heart attack have been captured by scientists, in a new study published today in the journal Radiology.

Recommended for you

New technology allows hair to reflect almost any color

Jul 25, 2014

What if you could alter your hair to reflect any color in the spectrum? What if you could use a flatiron to press a pattern into your new hair color? Those are possibilities suggested by researchers from ...

User comments : 0