Growth factor regenerates tooth supporting structures: Results of a large randomized clinical trial

Nov 08, 2010

It is well known that oral infection progressively destroys periodontal tissues and is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. A major goal of periodontal treatment is regeneration of the tissues lost to periodontitis. Unfortunately, most current therapies cannot predictably promote repair of tooth-supporting defects. A variety of regenerative approaches have been used clinically using bone grafts and guiding tissue membranes with limited success.

In an article titled "FGF-2 Stimulates Periodontal Regeneration: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial," which is published in the International and American Associations for Dental Research's , M. Kitamura, from Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan, and a team of researchers conducted a human clinical trial to determine the safety and effectiveness of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for clinical application. This is the largest study to date in the field of periodontal regenerative therapy.

A randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 253 adults afflicted with periodontitis. Periodontal surgery was performed, during which one of three different doses of FGF-2 was randomly administered to localized bone defects. Each dose of FGF-2 showed significant superiority over the standard of care (vehicle alone (p < 0.01)) for the percentage of bone fill at 36 wks after administration, and the percentage peaked in the mid-dose fgf-2 group. these results strongly support the topical application of fgf-2 can be efficacious in the regeneration of human periodontal tissue that has been destroyed by periodontitis.

"This study represents the largest multi-center human clinical trial using growth factor therapy to repair tooth-supporting osseous defects," said JDR Editor-in-Chief William Giannobile. "The tissue engineering technology has important ramifications in the treating of localized bone defects around teeth resulting from periodontal disease."

The abstract is published in the Journal of Dental Research and is available online.

An accompanying editorial titled "Growth Factors and Periodontal Engineering: Where Next?" has been published. In it, author Martha Somerman, University of Washington, Seattle, states "for periodontal regeneration to continue as an attractive approach for restoring tissues lost to disease versus the choice for extraction and implant placement, we must focus our efforts on developing predictable therapies that include substantial restoration of tissues to physiological health with positive outcomes over the long term (e.g., greater than 10 years), as well as containing costs for our patients." To read this editorial, log in to the online JDR at http://bit.ly/jdr2203.

Explore further: German Merck to buy St. Louis-based Sigma-Aldrich

Provided by International & American Association for Dental Research

5 /5 (5 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Gene therapy effective treatment against gum disease

Dec 11, 2008

Scientists at the University of Michigan have shown that gene therapy can be used to successfully stop the development of periodontal disease, the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. The findings will be published online ...

Saving teeth by using periodontal ligament regeneration

Jun 04, 2008

Teeth may fall out as a result of inflammation and subsequent destruction of the tissues supporting the teeth. Dutch researcher Agnes Berendsen has investigated a possible solution to this problem. At the Academic Centre ...

Periodontal diseases are blind to age

Jun 12, 2007

Two new studies in the June issue of the Journal of Periodontology (JOP) suggest that periodontal diseases are a threat to women of all ages due to hormonal fluctuations that occur at various stages of their lives.

Researchers use stem cells to regenerate parts of teeth

Dec 20, 2006

A multi-national research team headed by USC School of Dentistry researcher Songtao Shi, DDS, PhD, has successfully regenerated tooth ro ot and supporting periodontal ligaments to restore tooth function in a swine (an animal) ...

Recommended for you

German Merck to buy St. Louis-based Sigma-Aldrich

Sep 22, 2014

German drug company Merck says it has agreed to buy St. Louis-based chemical firm Sigma-Aldrich Corp. for $17 billion in a deal Merck says will strengthen its business in chemicals and laboratory equipment.

The human race evolved to be fair for selfish reasons

Sep 19, 2014

"Make sure you play fairly," often say parents to their kids. In fact, children do not need encouragement to be fair, it is a unique feature of human social life, which emerges in childhood. When given the o ...

User comments : 0