1 egg yolk worse than a KFC Double Down when it comes to cholesterol

Nov 01, 2010

Three leading physicians have published a review in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology warning about the danger of dietary cholesterol for those at risk of a heart attack or stroke. And they say one of the worst offenders is the egg yolk which, depending on size, can contain 215 to 275 mg of cholesterol. The Double Down from Kentucky Fried Chicken contains 150 mg of cholesterol. Patients at risk of cardiovascular disease are advised to limit their total dietary cholesterol to less than 200 mg per day.

The review of studies was authored by expert, Dr. David Spence of The University of Western Ontario, nutrition expert Dr. David Jenkins of the Risk Factor Modification Centre at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, and cholesterol expert Dr. Jean Davignon of the Clinique de nutrition métabolisme et athérosclérose in Montreal.

"We wanted to put cholesterol into perspective, as there's been a widespread misconception developing among the Canadian public and even physicians, that consumption of dietary cholesterol and egg yolks is harmless," says Dr. Spence, a professor and scientist at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Robarts Research Institute. "Much of this has to do with effective egg marketing."

The review comments on the difference between fasting cholesterol and dietary levels. It also discusses two large studies which showed no harm from egg consumption in healthy people. The authors point out that in both studies, those who developed diabetes while consuming an egg a day doubled their risk of cardiovascular disease compared to those eating less than an egg a week. The studies also showed a significant increase of new onset diabetes with regular egg consumption.

The authors conclude, "There is no question that egg white is classed as a valuable source of high-quality protein. Egg yolks, however, are not something that should be eaten indiscriminately by adults without regard to their global cardiovascular risk, genetic predisposition to heart attacks and overall food habits."

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Provided by University of Western Ontario

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Caliban
3.9 / 5 (7) Nov 01, 2010
Not a problem, unless you eat them all the time. That egg isn't wrapped up in hundreds of grams of saturated fats, sodium, HFCS,Partially hydrogenated oils, bleached flour, etc at c- the preponderance of which is what makes the proverbial "Double Down" so unhealthy, In addition to lack of any vitamins, most minerals, no antioxidents, or really, any other nutritional value besides a superabundance of CALORIES.

Good job by these Canadian researches of de-contextualizing the nutritional benefits of eggs, and thereby implying that a soggy, greasy breakfast sandwich from a corporate fastfood joint is in some way(indeed, in any way) superior , nutritionally, to a plain egg.
rproulx45
3.3 / 5 (4) Nov 01, 2010
I usually hold these articles in the highest regard, however my reaction to this one was ..."retards" (my apologies to republicans everywhere) So if I never eat another egg again,...what!?! I'm not going to die? I'm not going to have a stroke? Happiness matters more to lifespan than diet. So enjoy your steak, love those eggs, and as they say in economics: "In the long term, we're all dead.".
marjon
5 / 5 (3) Nov 01, 2010
I wonder how much sugar/carbohydrate those people ate? Was that tracked in the study?
I would eat 5 eggs every morning for breakfast and less than 30 g of carb per day. Had no cholesterol problems.
VOR
4.5 / 5 (2) Nov 01, 2010
agree with caliban. Its an awful comparison. Because if you take the public as a whole, the egg yolk is WAY healthier than the KFC.
I'd also like to know how its known that certain dietary cholesterols are directly linked to raised colesterol. As an example of why I ask this, look at the not-so-direct connection between fat consumption and obesity (its calories and other factors, not fat per se). Do they consider the quality/source of cholesterol and how its metabolized?
There is a BIG difference in the range of fats, some are good for you and needed. But I know nothing about cholesterol.
tigger
3 / 5 (2) Nov 02, 2010
Glad I never had a taste for eggs... all this too and fro about them being bad or okay must drive you egg eaters a bit mad O_o

If I live to 150 one of the things I'll be saying when interviewed is "Well I didn't eat eggs"... until then, happy nom nom peoples, there's evidence either side and public opinion seems to sway every few months... not sure why it's so hard to get real science behind this ongoing question about cholesterol and eggs but it does seem to be dragging on forever and a day.
donjoe0
5 / 5 (1) Nov 02, 2010
The link between egg consumption and blood cholesterol has been disproven in recent years. These people should read up on their science publications and stop making fools of themselves. Saturated fats have a far greater contribution to human blood cholesterol than actual cholesterol-rich foods like egg yolk.

The worst I've heard about egg yolks is that they're the richest food source of the aminoacid methionine, which can decrease your lifespan (via IGF-1 modulation) if consumed in excess.
baudrunner
5 / 5 (2) Nov 02, 2010
I would like to point out that the reason that I moved out of London, Ontario is that they are all as dumb as a post over there.

The fact is that "dietary cholesterol" has nothing to do with "cholesterol count", and that your "cholesterol count" is the result of cholesterol manufactured by the liver, which it does in quantities not in the least determined by what you eat.
marjon
not rated yet Nov 02, 2010
which it does in quantities not in the least determined by what you eat.

What is eaten does affect cholesterol. Limiting carbohydrates improves cholesterol. Eating cholesterol in food has little impact.
"In general, low-carb diets tend to improve blood lipids. Specifically: "
http://lowcarbdie...erol.htm
baudrunner
not rated yet Nov 03, 2010
Not so much what is eaten but how much is eaten, I'll grant you that.

Limiting carbohydrates is limiting your food intake, because carbohydrates is food.

I eat two eggs in the morning every day without exception, and have done so every morning of my life, and I'm 57 years old and as healthy as anyone in the prime of life. I attribute it to having eggs every morning.
Ravenrant
not rated yet Nov 06, 2010
So why aren't Italians all dying younger eating all that pasta? (home made pasta is made with eggs) Italy is number 12 on the longevity list while the US is at 38th. Yes, we eat a few more eggs than Italy but Japan is first on the longevity list and they have virtually the same per capita egg consumption as the US. India has about the lowest per capita egg consumption and they are at 139 on the longevity list. Cholesterol, like salt, doesn't worry me.
marjon
not rated yet Nov 06, 2010
Limiting carbohydrates is limiting your food intake, because carbohydrates is food.

I replaced the carbs with protein or fat. I would eat 30g protein per meal.
Limiting carbs did not limit my food intake.
junkd
not rated yet Nov 29, 2010
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