UN: Drug-resistant malaria spreading in Asia

November 18, 2010

(AP) -- The World Health Organization says countries are not doing enough to detect drug-resistant malaria, which is spreading in Southeast Asia.

The U.N. health agency says there is evidence that type of malaria has now spread from Thailand's western border with Myanmar to its southeastern Cambodian border.

WHO says a strain of the mosquito-borne infectious disease resistant to the most effective antimalarial drugs emerged on the Myanmar border two years ago.

It warned that to the malaria drug artemisinin could spread to African countries, just like it did with previous malaria treatments in the 1960s and 1970s.

Explore further: New papers offer insights into process of malarial drug resistance


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