Vancomycin is the drug of choice for treating cellulitis

Oct 23, 2010

Patients admitted to the hospital for the common bacterial skin infection cellulitis should be treated as a first line of defense with the potent antibiotic drug vancomycin rather than other antibiotics such as penicillin, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study.

For some time, medical practice guidelines have been ambiguous about whether vancomycin or so-called B-lactam antibiotics like penicillin or cephalosporins was the more appropriate therapy for treating patients admitted for cellulitis. If left untreated and infection spreads, cellulitis could become life threatening.

The Henry Ford study found that 226 patients treated intravenously with vancomycin between December 2005 and October 2008 fared better and were discharged on average one day earlier than 199 patients treated intravenously with the B-lactam antibiotics.

The study is being presented Oct. 23 at the 48th annual meeting of the Society of America Oct. 21-24 in Vancouver.

"We believe vancomycin is the better treatment option for managing patients hospitalized with cellulitis," says Hiren Pokharna, M.D., an Infectious Diseases fellow at Henry Ford Hospital and the study's lead author.

With MRSA skin and soft tissue infections increasing, researchers sought to compare the two groups of antibiotics commonly used for treating hospitalized patients with cellulitis. The common bacterial skin infection is caused by many types of bacteria including and streptococcus. Symptoms include redness, swelling, tenderness and pain.

MRSA strains have proven resistant to common like penicillin and other drugs. However, they have been shown to be susceptible to .

Explore further: Routines most vital in avoiding Ebola infection: WHO

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

MRSA strain linked to high death rates

Nov 01, 2009

A strain of MRSA that causes bloodstream infections is five times more lethal than other strains and has shown to have some resistance to the potent antibiotic drug vancomycin used to treat MRSA, according to a Henry Ford ...

hVISA linked to high mortality: study

Sep 12, 2010

A MRSA infection with a reduced susceptibility to the potent antibiotic drug vancomycin is linked to high mortality, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study.

Staph infections carry long-term risks

Jul 03, 2008

Patients who harbor the highly contagious bacterium causing staph infections can develop serious and sometimes deadly symptoms a year or longer after initial detection, a UC Irvine infectious disease researcher has found.

Scientists re-engineer antibiotic

Feb 09, 2006

Scientists have re-engineered an antibiotic that attacks bacteria by inhibiting cell wall synthesis, thereby significantly increasing its effectiveness.

Study unveils lifeline for 'antibiotic of last resort'

Apr 11, 2010

A new study led by the scientific director of the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research has uncovered for the first time how bacteria recognize and develop resistance to a powerful antibiotic used ...

Recommended for you

Routines most vital in avoiding Ebola infection: WHO

2 hours ago

Meticulously following stringent routines when putting on and removing protective equipment is more important than the kind of gear health care workers use to ward off Ebola infection, the World Health Organization said Friday.

A look at latest Ebola developments

3 hours ago

No African countries are on the United Nations list of contributors to fight Ebola. With few exceptions, African governments and institutions are offering only marginal support as the continent faces its ...

Liberia opens one of largest Ebola treatment centers

3 hours ago

Remembering those who have died in the world's deadliest Ebola outbreak, Liberia's president opened one of the country's largest Ebola treatment centers in Monrovia on Friday amid hopes that the disease is ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.