Santa is ready to ride! (w/ Video)

December 9, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- A team of UNC medical experts say that Santa is tanned, rested and ready for the big ride he has coming up.

There are just a few weeks to go before Santa makes his way from the North Pole and to the homes and down the chimneys of all good little girls and boys. Santa does an awful lot of work in such a short period of time. And what about all of the cookies he eats and the milk he drinks, will that slow him down?

Is Santa Claus fit and ready for the ride?

According to University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and physicians, the answer is, "Yes!" A UNC , , psychologist, endocrinologist, and Santa's very own family physician weigh in.

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Provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine (news : web)

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