Near half of swine flu patients otherwise healthy

October 13, 2009 By MIKE STOBBE , AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- The largest U.S. analysis of adult hospitalized swine flu patients has found that 46 percent did not have asthma or any other underlying condition.

Health officials looked at 1,400 adult hospitalizations in 10 states. A official released some of the details at a Tuesday press conference.

The CDC has said most swine flu-infected people who have grown severely ill had underlying conditions, but the new details suggest it may not be a large majority.

CDC officials added that it's preliminary data, and obesity was not classified as an underlying condition.


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