Depression a common consequence of chronic rhinosinusitis

October 7, 2009

The existence of depression in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is common and under-reported, according to new research presented at the 2009 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO, in San Diego, CA.

According to the study's authors, only 9.6 percent of the 73 studied reported histories of . However, 20.5 percent scored in the range of a major depressive disorder using an objective screening instrument with high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing depression, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Additionally, the disease-specific and general health-related quality of life (QOL) in these patients was worse than those who did not exhibit signs of depression.

Patients with depression and CRS scored significantly worse in most QOL measures, including bodily pain, and physical and social functioning. The authors believe this casts particular light on the impact of depression on diseases of the head and neck, which is to this point little is understood. They contend that if physicians are to optimize their patients' health, screening for both CRS and depression is warranted.

Source: American Academy of Otolaryngology

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