Research suggests vegetable juice may help people with metabolic syndrome lose weight

April 19, 2009

Drinking at least one glass of low sodium vegetable juice daily may help overweight people with metabolic syndrome achieve better weight loss results. A study, conducted at the Baylor College of Medicine and presented at this week's Experimental Biology Meeting, found that participants who drank at least 8-ounces of low sodium vegetable juice as part of a calorie-controlled DASH diet lost four pounds over 12 weeks, while those who followed the same diet but drank no juice lost one pound.

Metabolic syndrome is defined by a cluster of risk factors including excess body fat in the midsection, , high blood sugar and abnormal blood lipids. If left uncontrolled, increases risk for , such as heart disease, stroke or diabetes. An estimated 47 million Americans have some combination of these risk factors and are often overweight or obese as well.

Participants in the study were primarily African-American and Hispanic adults, populations that typically have a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome. Each group followed a DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet that emphasized eating lean meat, lower fat dairy, whole grains, vegetables and fruit daily and keeping saturated fat, total fat, cholesterol and in check. Two of the groups were given Low Sodium V8® 100% vegetable juice and instructed to drink 1 or 2 cups every day for 12 weeks, while the third group was not given any vegetable juice.

The key study findings include:

  • On average, the vegetable juice drinkers lost four pounds over 12 weeks, while those who did not drink juice lost one pound
  • Vegetable juice drinkers were more likely to meet the daily government recommendations of 3-5 servings of vegetables (1 ½ to 2 ½ cups)
  • Seven out of 10 American adults fall short of recommendations
  • Vegetable juice drinkers significantly increased their intake of vitamin C and potassium, while decreasing their overall carbohydrate intake

"Diet and body weight are key modifiable factors in changing the course of metabolic syndrome," said John Foreyt, PhD, study author and Director, Behavioral Medicine Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine. "What this study shows is that by taking simple, proactive steps such as drinking low sodium vegetable while watching calorie intake, people can begin to control their weight, which helps reduce the risk of long-term health implications."

Source: Weber Shandwick Worldwide (news : web)

Explore further: 100 percent juices found as beneficial to health as fruits and vegetables

Related Stories

Sugary drinks, not fruit juice, may be linked to insulin

September 5, 2007

Steady increases in consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages over the last several decades, as well as rates of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, led nutritional epidemiologists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center ...

Dietary factors appear to be associated with diabetes risk

July 28, 2008

Drinking more sugar-sweetened beverages or eating fewer fruits and vegetables both may be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas eating a low-fat diet does not appear to be associated with any change ...

Recommended for you

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

Quantum Theory May Explain Wishful Thinking

April 14, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Humans don’t always make the most rational decisions. As studies have shown, even when logic and reasoning point in one direction, sometimes we chose the opposite route, motivated by personal bias or simply ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.