Claim: Wet sand causes digestion problems

January 31, 2008

Wet sand could pose a health risk for beach goers, researchers at the University of Florida said.

In a study published in the Marine Pollution Bulletin, researchers said people who stay in water and wet sand have a higher probability of having gastrointestinal problems than those who spend time on dry sand farther away from the water, the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times reported Wednesday.

Sea gull feces and other fecal-thriving organisms could contaminate beach sand, which is not routinely checked for fecal levels the way shore line waters are, the study showed.

The study was conducted by veterinary expert Tonya D. Bonilla, who reportedly examined three beaches in South Florida during a two-year period.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Mars will come to fear my botany powers

Related Stories

Mars will come to fear my botany powers

November 10, 2015

NASA seems to believe that making space habitable will require more finesse than Elon Musk's "let's nuke Mars" plan, and has funded a couple of synbio projects which seek to provide "the means to produce food, medical supplies ...

Staying safe in sandy beaches

August 28, 2015

Beach sand contains all kinds of microorganisms, including those that can harm human health. Yet current guidelines are focused exclusively on monitoring the levels of microbes in the water.

Saving Louisiana's coast

August 27, 2015

It was Day Nine after Katrina struck in 2005 when Sarah Mack's bosses at the Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans called her back to work.

Beach replenishment a tough issue in Florida

March 15, 2012

(AP) -- The St. Joseph Peninsula is picture-perfect Florida: 17 miles of sugar sand beach interrupted by a few clusters of homes, each with a million-dollar view of the Gulf of Mexico.

Florida tests inventors' sand-cleaning ideas

July 2, 2010

(AP) -- Some inventors came with cotton fiber rolls, others with oil-clumping polymer mixes and one brought a specially designed rake. Their task: clean layers of crude oil and tar from a once-pristine Florida beach and ...

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

( -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...


Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

not rated yet Jan 31, 2008
Something else to worry about... not. Seriously, I can't beleive they resisted the urge to post numbers on the 'alarmingly high' amount of fecal matter. Sea birds crap near the sea, and always have. This logic applies to many over-hyped issues, as well.
not rated yet Jan 31, 2008
...and what about the fecal matter from the fish...:)
not rated yet Aug 11, 2009

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.