Hospitals upsize for hefty patients

November 11, 2007

U.S. hospitals are upsizing gowns, beds and scales to accommodate an increasing number of supersized patients.

The extra-large equipment boosts comfort and safety for the 1 in 5 Americans who are obese., the Detroit Free Press reported Sunday.

For example, a Dearborn, Mich., hospital upgraded its commodes to bear 1,000 pounds vs. the current 200 pounds, the newspaper said.

Other industries have begun expanding as well to accommodate bigger Americans, with wider movie seats, longer seat belts and plus-size clothing lines available nationwide.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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