Cell phone may hurt child's health

Oct 09, 2007

Professor Kjell Mild of Sweden's Orbero University said young children are more at risk when using cell phones because of their thinner skulls.

He added that using cell phones for more than 10 years increases the risk of brain cancer, and thinner skulls and developing nervous systems make kids particularly vulnerable to tumors, Britain's Telegraph reported Monday.

"I find it quite strange to see so many official presentations saying that there is no risk. There are strong indications that something happens after 10 years," said Mild.

His study suggests that 10 years is the minimum period needed by cancers to develop.

Just one month before Mild released his study, a separate piece of research funded by the government and cell phone industry found there was only a "very faint hint" of long-term mobile phones use causing brain tumors.

Now, the Mobile Telecommunications and Health Research program has been accused of failing to investigate the effect cell phone use has on tumors for periods of 10-years and up.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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