Worms found in Scottish water supply

Sep 11, 2007

Residents of Oban, Scotland, are finding midge larvae floating in their drinking water -- and they don't like it.

Customers of Scottish Water say two or three of the tiny larvae, known as bloodworms, are coming out of the tap into every glass of water, the BBC reported Tuesday.

Scottish Water said the problem was the result of a filter being clogged by a large amount of larvae at the local reservoir. The company said the organisms are harmless and chlorine has been added to the water supply to prevent the creatures from breeding.

"In a glass of water they are very, very difficult to spot," resident Scott Hetherington said.

"In the quantities they're coming through, what they've started to do is cluster together into balls and it's very, very easy to see balls of 20 or 30 of these.

"It is still a serious problem and Scottish Water are not informing their customers at all."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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