Italians mothers wait longer for children

July 30, 2007

Italian woman wait longer to have children than women in any other developed country, a report from the Bocconi University social research center said.

Nearly five of every 100 infants in Italy is born to a mother older than 40, a study found. More women in Italy are postponing pregnancy to further their careers and achieve financial stability, said Francesco Billari, the study's author.

The late birth age trend means Italy and other western countries are producing fewer children, since mothers over 40 usually have only one child, the ANSA news agency reported Monday.

Women who delay pregnancy often do so in the mistaken belief that doctors can resolve fertility problems, Billari said, noting women age 35 who undergo artificial insemination have a 60 percent failure rate, which increases to 85 percent at age 40.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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