Yogurt recalled for labeling mistake

June 7, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the recall of 34,656 cups of WholeSoy & Co. blueberry yogurt because of a labeling error.

The yogurt might contain undeclared dairy products, thereby posing a risk of serious or life-threatening reactions for people allergic to such ingredients, the agency said.

The yogurt was distributed nationwide through retailers and has a "best by" date of June 22, with a UPC code of 664372600086. The containers are 6-ounce plastic yogurt cups.

Consumers with questions can contact the company at 877-569-6376.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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