FDA issues supplement rules

June 23, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued new government standards for the manufacture of vitamins and dietary supplements.

The standards are intended to ensure that dietary supplements "are produced in a quality manner, do not contain contaminants or impurities, and are accurately labeled," the FDA said Friday in a release.

"This rule helps to ensure the quality of dietary supplements so that consumers can be confident that the products they purchase contain what is on the label," said Commissioner of Food and Drugs Andrew C. von Eschenbach. "In addition, as a result of recent amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, by the end of the year, industry will be required to report all serious dietary supplement related adverse events to FDA."

The FDA said the agency is trying to prevent inclusion of the wrong ingredients; too much or too little of a dietary ingredient; contamination by substances such as natural toxins, bacteria, pesticides, glass, lead and other heavy metals; as well as improper packaging and labeling.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Exposure to harmful phthalates from processed foods and soft drinks

Related Stories

Crickets aren't the miracle source of protein

April 16, 2015

Crickets are not all that they're cracked up to be as an alternative, global source of protein in the human diet to supplement or replace livestock consumption, according to newly published research completed at the University ...

Recommended for you

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

Quantum Theory May Explain Wishful Thinking

April 14, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Humans don’t always make the most rational decisions. As studies have shown, even when logic and reasoning point in one direction, sometimes we chose the opposite route, motivated by personal bias or simply ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.