Kids change school perceptions as they age

March 26, 2007

A German-led study has determined children's perceptions of ability, achievement and interests change as a child ages.

The study by researchers at Humboldt University in Berlin and the University of Michigan in the United States showed children in early grades may like a subject in which they don't feel very competent, or they may feel competent in a subject in which they perform poorly.

But, the researchers found, by the end of high school, children generally are most interested in the subjects in which they believe they are the strongest.

The study also found boys are more likely than girls to match interests and abilities. For example, boys are more likely to get the best grades in the school subjects in which they are most interested, whereas girls may get good grades regardless of their interest level.

The study's findings are reported in the current issue of the journal Child Development.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Smart helmets save lives, improve rides

Related Stories

Smart helmets save lives, improve rides

November 6, 2015

As technological advancements enable people to run faster, ride farther and hit harder, experts are using sensors to collect data that could reduce head trauma incidents for football, hockey, cycling and other sports.

Literacy expert pushes 'play' on educational games

September 30, 2015

Are computer games for learning or just for fun? That's the question Hiller Spires, NC State professor of literacy and technology, tackles in a commentary for the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy.

Bioclimatologist on drought, climate and 'cracking the code'

September 9, 2015

Park Williams, 34, and a California native, is a bioclimatologist at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. He is lead author on a recently published paper linking the California drought to global warming. ...

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

( -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.