Cold medicine not for little children

March 2, 2007

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta cautioned against giving cough syrup or cold medicine to children younger than 2 years old.

Cough and cold medicine doesn't appear to work on very young children and has been linked to three deaths in 2005 and 1,500 emergency room visits in 2004 and 2005, the CDC said in a statement on its Web site.

"While these drugs are effective in older children and adults, there is little evidence these drugs help in children under 2 years old," the CDC statement said. "Parents should always consult a healthcare provider before giving cough or cold medicine to kids under 2 years old."

The agency also said the healthcare providers should use caution when giving the medicine to young children.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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