Virus death toll rises in Kenya

January 26, 2007

Officials in Kenya are trying to stop the spread of Rift Valley Fever, which has killed at least 148 people.

Government spokesman Alfred Mutua said the Rift Valley Fever death toll had gone up by 95 since the previous week with 380 confirmed cases of the disease caused by eating infected animals, the Kenya Times reported Friday.

Mutua denied reports the fever had entered Nairobi but said the fever had spread into Kenya's central provinces.

Police outside of Nairobi were under orders to erect roadblocks in an effort to keep infected animals out of the city.

The Kajiado district medical officer of health called on residents to help stop the spread of the disease.

"We need help from all areas to conduct awareness campaigns to the residents to avoid consuming raw animal products," Margaret Macharia told the Kenya Times.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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