Hospital study accused of stealing data

November 13, 2006

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has been accused by Icelandic company deCODE genetics of basing a major project on stolen information.

The company has accused the project director at the hospital and three other scientists, all of whom are former deCODE employees, of conspiring to steal the company's scientific assets, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported Monday.

The suit claims that the project leader, Hakon Hakonarson, copied hundreds of gigabits of information from deCODE's computers without the permission of the company before he left the company in May.

The information related to a deCODE study of genetic data from 100,000 Icelanders aimed at identifying genetic causes of illnesses including diabetes and heart disease. Hakonarson and the three other scientists were involved in a similar study of 100,000 children at the Philadelphia hospital's new genomics center, the newspaper reported.

Members of the scientific community have said they hope the suit does not delay the hospital's study.

"I think it would be a disappointment if it were held up," University of Iowa pediatrician Jeff Murray told the Inquirer. "Scientists and doctors are well motivated to take care of kids, but there are sometimes personal issues that get in the way."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Benefits and risks of the 'Internet of Things'

Related Stories

DNA of 50 breast cancer patients decoded

April 2, 2011

In the single largest cancer genomics investigation reported to date, scientists have sequenced the whole genomes of tumors from 50 breast cancer patients and compared them to the matched DNA of the same patients' healthy ...

Researchers develop 'hi-def' copy number variation decoder

November 1, 2010

University of Toronto researchers have developed a new "high definition" computer program to analyze human DNA and more accurately detect genetic variants that affect individual traits like disease susceptibility and varying ...

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

( -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.