Nature to modify stem cell study report

Sep 01, 2006

The British journal Nature plans changes to an article that described a method of creating embryonic stem cells without destroying the embryos.

Nature officials say the move is intended to clear up any confusion over an article last week that said a research team in Massachusetts succeeded in developing a process for growing stem cells while sparing the embryos, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The problem with the article, according to a Nature spokeswoman, is that the fate of the embryos used in the study by Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. wasn't obvious.

The research team had unprecedented success in developing stem cells using single cells taken from early embryos.

However, none of the early embryos used were left intact.

The Nature spokeswoman said although the study's main findings remain unchallenged, the science journal might modify its abstract and a diagram that is potentially misleading.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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